command and control warfare

(redirected from Signals warfare)
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Related to Signals warfare: Command and control warfare

command and control warfare

The integrated use of operations security, military deception, psychological operations, electronic warfare, and physical destruction, mutually supported by intelligence, to deny information to, influence, degrade, or destroy adversary command and control capabilities, while protecting friendly command and control capabilities against such actions. Command and control warfare is an application of information operations in military operations. Also called C2W. C2W is both offensive and defensive: a. C2-attack. Prevent effective C2 of adversary forces by denying information to, influencing, degrading, or destroying the adversary C2 system. b. C2-protect. Maintain effective command and control of own forces by turning to friendly advantage or negating adversary efforts to deny information to, influence, degrade, or destroy the friendly C2 system. See also command and control; electronic warfare; information operations; intelligence; military deception; operations security; psychological operations.
References in periodicals archive ?
CACI International Inc (NYSE: CAI) announced on 3 July that it has been awarded a three year contract under the US Army's Strategic Services Sourcing (S3) contract vehicle to support the US Army Project Director, Signals Warfare (PD SW).
Army Communications and Electronics Command (C4IEW), Project Manager Signals Warfare, Warrenton, Va.
Herb Hovey, director of the US Army Center for Signals Warfare at Vint Hill from 1977-1990, testified before the BRAC Commission and said he would be "hard-pressed to fault them.
The office of the project manager for signals warfare within the IEW organization currently oversees several programs in the jamming arena.
In addition to ESI's own investigations, the Army's CECOM Signals Warfare Directorate at Vint Hill Farms Station, VA, reportedly has a number of developments under investigation that could offer improved performance for small and readily deployable antennas.