sign language

(redirected from Signed language)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

sign language

n.
1. A language that uses a system of manual, facial, and other body movements as the means of communication, especially among deaf people.
2. A method of communication, as between speakers of different languages, that uses hand movements and other gestures.

sign language

n
1. (Languages) another word for signing
2. (Languages) any system of communication by manual signs or gestures

sign′ lan`guage


n.
1. any of several visual-gestural systems of communication, esp. employing manual gestures, as used among deaf people.
2. any means of communication, as between speakers of different languages, using gestures.
[1840–50]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sign language - language expressed by visible hand gesturessign language - language expressed by visible hand gestures
language, linguistic communication - a systematic means of communicating by the use of sounds or conventional symbols; "he taught foreign languages"; "the language introduced is standard throughout the text"; "the speed with which a program can be executed depends on the language in which it is written"
finger spelling, fingerspelling - an alphabet of manual signs
American sign language, ASL - the sign language used in the United States
sign - a gesture that is part of a sign language
Translations
znaková řeč
tegnsprog
viittomakieli
znakovni jezik
jelbeszéd
手話
수화
teckenspråk
ภาษาสัญลักษณ์
ngôn ngữ cử chỉ

sign language

nlinguaggio dei muti

sign language

لُغَةُ الإشَارَة znaková řeč tegnsprog Zeichensprache νοηματική γλώσσα lenguaje por señas viittomakieli langue des signes znakovni jezik linguaggio dei segni 手話 수화 gebarentaal tegnspråk język migowy linguagem de sinais кинетическая речь teckenspråk ภาษาสัญลักษณ์ işaret dili ngôn ngữ cử chỉ 哑语

sign lan·guage

n. lenguaje mímico por señales. V.: dactylology
References in periodicals archive ?
Critique: A sign language (also signed language or simply signing) is a language which uses manual communication and body language to convey meaning, as opposed to acoustically conveyed sound patterns.
The PRO-Signs project aims to establish European standards for signed language proficiency for professional purposes, focusing specifically on sign language teaching in Deaf Studies and Sign Language Interpreting programmes.
In contrast to the medical perspective of deafness, which reduces the experience of deafness to a physical condition and a pedagogical problem, the works of Deaf historians have revealed a vibrant culture with its own folklore, visual humor, publications and associations, as well as its own primary, signed language.