significs


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significs

(sɪɡˈnɪfɪks)
n
(Philosophy) the science of meaning
References in periodicals archive ?
She covers critical semiotics, structures, and models; signification, logic, and iconicity; understanding, significs, and dialogism; the centrality of translation for semiotics; and from global semiotics to semioethics.
With little, if any, formal education, she developed the early concepts of what she called "significs" and is now known as "semiotics".
[8] Given such an original perspective, Welby introduced a neologism and called her approach to signs and language "significs." This approach and the name she chose for it found consensus in trends and among authors that have become well established to Victoria Welby's disadvantage in the sense that her pivotal role is only now emerging in all its force and importance.
To Thoreau, " "woman" significs "social," which signifies "clutter" interfering with the mind, the self, and nature.
Sensus Spiritualis: Studies in Medieval Significs and the Philology of Culture.
(12) Mauthner acknowledges affinities between his position and that of the significs movement led by Lady Welby, who also denies the notion of an absolute, transcendent meaning: "The English theory of meaning is not far removed from a critique of language.
Semiotic and Significs: Correspondence between Charles S.
Different philosophical trends as found in disciplines such as Nominalism, Realism, Phenomenalism, Significs, Semiotic, Logical Positivism, etc., also become unified by a methodology, with internationally applicable techniques, which I call 'non-aristotelian,' as it includes, yet goes beyond and brings up to date, the aims and formulations of Aristotle.
4, 1908, published in Semiotics and Significs; The Correspondence between C.