terrestrial planet

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Related to Silicate planet: Terrestrial planets

terrestrial planet

n.
Any of the four planets, Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars, whose orbits are closest to the sun. Also called inner planet.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

in′ner plan′et


n.
any of the four planets closest to the sun: Mercury, Venus, Earth, or Mars.
[1950–55]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.terrestrial planet - a planet having a compact rocky surface like the Earth's; the four innermost planets in the solar system
major planet, planet - (astronomy) any of the nine large celestial bodies in the solar system that revolve around the sun and shine by reflected light; Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto in order of their proximity to the sun; viewed from the constellation Hercules, all the planets rotate around the sun in a counterclockwise direction
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References in periodicals archive ?
Cutaway views show a carbon-based planet, possibly made mostly of silicon carbide, or carborundum, compared with the preponderance of oxygen-rich compounds in a silicate planet like Earth.
But last year Marc Kuchner (NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) and Sara Seager (Carnegie Institution of Washington) presented models showing that silicate planets aren't the only possibility (S&T: May 2005, page 19).
Silicate planets regulate their internal thermal state through melting events in their mantles; through transport of these melts and entrained heat to their surfaces; through creation of new lithosphere; and through recycling of cold crust and lithosphere back into their hot convective interiors (e.g., Davies, 1999).