Simplon Pass


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Sim·plon Pass

 (sĭm′plŏn′, săNm-plôN′)
A pass, 2,008 m (6,588 ft) high, between the Lepontine and Pennine Alps in southern Switzerland. A nearby railroad tunnel system, 19.8 km (12.3 mi) long, extends southeastward into Italy.

Simplon Pass

(ˈsɪmplɒn)
n
(Placename) a pass over the Lepontine Alps in S Switzerland, between Brig (Switzerland) and Iselle (Italy). Height: 2009 m (6590 ft)
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References in periodicals archive ?
This project deals with the Part Jordiguhittini located on the south side of the Simplon Pass.
It was outshone by neighbouring Brig only when a trading route with Italy was established via the Simplon Pass in the 15th century.
It then descends to Andermatt and continues down the Rhone Valley to Brig at the foot of the Simplon Pass.
3) From these and other sources, biographers and critics have substantially reconstructed the Alpine portion of the tour, motivated by the powerful yet enigmatic account of the crossing of the Simplon Pass.
In the large painting Where Chavez Flew, the Simplon Pass (1911) Adrian approaches abstraction while commemorating young Peruvian pilot George Chavez's pioneering flight across the Alps, which ended in success and tragedy as he suffered a fatal crash within a few feet of landing.
Tourism increased substantially after tunnelling of the nearby Simplon Pass allowed train service from north of the Alps to pass through Stresa, in 1906.
36 The Simplon Pass and Tunnel connect which two countries?
Both cars were tested in the depths of winter and driven over the demanding 6,578-foot high Simplon Pass that connects Switzerland and Italy.
Gondo lies on the Simplon Pass road connecting southern Switzerland with Italy.
This project deals with the Part Kapf located on the north side of the Simplon Pass.
7) As such, the panorama has become the foil of all property sublime episodes of The Prelude, most notably the Simplon Pass episode of Book 6.
2 Europe's first transcontinental express train, it covered 1,700 miles (2,740 km); after 1919 the route extended from Calais and Paris to Lausanne and via the Simplon Pass to Milan, Venice, Zagreb, and beyond.