Sinaitic

Related to Sinaitic: Sinaitic manuscript

Sinaitic

(ˌsaɪnɪˈɪtɪk) or

Sinaic

adj
1. (Placename) of or relating to the Sinai Peninsula
2. (Bible) of or relating to Mount Sinai
3. (Placename) of or relating to Mount Sinai
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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day." (86) Compare these words to his description of the Sinaitic
(5) This observation allows him to place the Sinaitic inscriptions in chronological sequence by working backward from more securely dated early alphabetic inscriptions found elsewhere, such as the Lahun heddle-jack and the Bet Shemesh plaque.
For an ancient formalizing rule for gifts, developed before even the invention of papyrus, see The Hammurabi Code: and the Sinaitic Legislation [section] 165, at 32 (Chilperic Edwards ed., 3d ed.
This is why this awareness still functions among the Gentiles even apart from the Sinaitic law, as Paul says in Romans 2:14 that the Gentiles "who do not have the law, do by nature things required by the law." The holy apostle could say this with truth because in his time people lived under Roman law that was developed in great detail on the specific issue of property.
A Fundamentalist would not necessarily think of her fundamentalism as "toxic." Supersessionists--who believe the new covenant has supplanted the old (Sinaitic) covenant--would have difficulty with Gritsch's view that the Jews "are and remain the people of God, even though they do not accept Jesus Christ as their messiah" (p.
When we come to the account of the Transfiguration (9:2-13), we find a number of connections with the giving of the Sinaitic law.
Najman asserts the following difference between the exegesis of Jewish Pseudepigrapha and that of New Testament and patristic texts: "In contrast to the familiar Christian claim to supersede the Sinaitic covenant with a new covenant ...
Today the dialect map of Egypt is relatively well established thanks to the Atlas of Egyptian Rural Arabic (Behnstedt and Woidich 1985-1994, henceforth B&W) and to a number of works including Behnstedt's and Woidich's numerous articles, (22) De Jong's work on Fayyoumi and Sinaitic Arabic (De Jong 1996a, 1996b, 1996c, 2000) and a few other studies (Abu Farag 1960; Doss 1981; Khalafallah 1969; Matar 1967; Nishio 1994).
She wishes that contemporary writers might also keep faith with "Jewish primacy." She wants them to honor, as she does, the "Sinaitic challenge of distinctive restraint and responsibility that the rabbis held out"--without rejecting "the offerings of the Enlightenment--which, in any case, we cannot avoid, forgo, or escape." (11) Fictions like "The Pagan Rabbi" and The Cannibal Galaxy, as well as several collections of essays, often represent as a conflict this "challenge" to honor what comes to us from the Jewish past even as we move, carefully, through the seductions and rationalizations of a post-Enlightenment world.