Sinclair


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Sin·clair

 (sĭn-klâr′, sĭng-), Upton Beall 1878-1968.
American writer and reformer. His concern with social justice is apparent in his novels, including The Jungle (1906) and Boston (1928).
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Sinclair

(sɪŋˈklɛə; ˈsɪŋklɛə)
n
1. (Biography) Sir Clive (Marles). born 1940, English electronics engineer, inventor, and entrepreneur, who produced such electronic goods as pocket calculators and some of the first home computers; however, the Sinclair C5 (1985), a small light electric vehicle for one person, proved a commercial failure
2. (Biography) Upton (Beall). 1878–1968, US novelist, whose The Jungle (1906) exposed the working and sanitary conditions of the Chicago meat-packing industry and prompted the passage of food inspection laws
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Sin•clair

(sɪnˈklɛər, sɪŋ-)

n.
Upton (Beall) (bɛl) 1878–1968, U.S. novelist and reformer.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Sinclair - United States writer whose novels argued for social reform (1878-1968)Sinclair - United States writer whose novels argued for social reform (1878-1968)
2.Sinclair - English electrical engineer who founded a company that introduced many innovative products (born in 1940)
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References in classic literature ?
Upon the fourth day of September, 1916, he set out with four companions, Sinclair, Brady, James, and Tippet, to search along the base of the barrier cliffs for a point at which they might be scaled.
"South Clark Street and heaven have something in common, then," suggested Sinclair. James and Tippet laughed, and then a hideous growl broke from a dense thicket ahead and diverted their attention to other matters.
There was, moreover, a band of fifteen free trappers, commanded by a gallant leader from Arkansas, named Sinclair, who held their encampment a little apart from the rest.
They were accompanied by Sinclair and his fifteen free trappers; Wyeth, also, and his New England band of beaver hunters and salmon fishers, now dwindled down to eleven, took this opportunity to prosecute their cruise in the wilderness, accompanied with such experienced pilots.
Sinclair, or as he preferred to be called, Professor Sinclair, waved a white kid glove in the direction of the dancing hall.
Sinclair, proprietor of the West Islington Dancing Academy, and host of these little gatherings--for a consideration of eighteenpence--did his best, by a running fire of conversation, to set everyone at their ease.
Sinclair," he said, "but simply a matter of business.
You know very well how impossible it is to persuade some of the folks in your village that Squire Sinclair does not feel above them.
Sinclair says he'll shoot himself if I don't marry him, and I say,
I can't help hoping all the time that Bowen and the girl have found the others; the last Bowen knew of them, there were six left, all told--the mate Bradley, the engineer Olson, and Wilson, Whitely, Brady and Sinclair. There might be some hope for them if they could join forces; but separated, I'm afraid they couldn't last long."
He took Sinclair, Brady, James, and Tippet with him.
The chief of the aeronautic establishment near West Point was Cabot Sinclair, and he allowed himself but one single moment of the posturing that was so universal in that democratic time.