microorganism

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mi·cro·or·gan·ism

 (mī′krō-ôr′gə-nĭz′əm)
n.
An organism or infectious agent of microscopic or submicroscopic size, especially a bacterium or protozoan.

microorganism

(ˌmaɪkrəʊˈɔːɡəˌnɪzəm)
n
(Microbiology) any organism, such as a bacterium, protozoan, or virus, of microscopic size

mi•cro•or•gan•ism

(ˌmaɪ kroʊˈɔr gəˌnɪz əm)

n.
any organism too small to be viewed by the unaided eye, as bacteria or some fungi and algae.
[1875–80]
mi`cro•or•gan′ic
(-ɔrˈgæn ɪk)
adj.

mi·cro·or·gan·ism

(mī′krō-ôr′gə-nĭz′əm)
An organism that can be seen only with the aid of a microscope. Microorganisms include bacteria, protozoans, algae, and fungi. See Note at germ.

microorganism

any one of a large variety of microscopic or ultramicroscopic organisms, as bacteria, viruses, etc.
See also: Organisms
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.microorganism - any organism of microscopic sizemicroorganism - any organism of microscopic size  
organism, being - a living thing that has (or can develop) the ability to act or function independently
animal, animate being, beast, creature, fauna, brute - a living organism characterized by voluntary movement
plant life, flora, plant - (botany) a living organism lacking the power of locomotion
monad - (biology) a single-celled microorganism (especially a flagellate protozoan)
intestinal flora - harmless microorganisms (as Escherichia coli) that inhabit the intestinal tract and are essential for its normal functioning
virus - (virology) ultramicroscopic infectious agent that replicates itself only within cells of living hosts; many are pathogenic; a piece of nucleic acid (DNA or RNA) wrapped in a thin coat of protein
moneran, moneron - organisms that typically reproduce by asexual budding or fission and whose nutritional mode is absorption or photosynthesis or chemosynthesis
bacteria, bacterium - (microbiology) single-celled or noncellular spherical or spiral or rod-shaped organisms lacking chlorophyll that reproduce by fission; important as pathogens and for biochemical properties; taxonomy is difficult; often considered to be plants
microbe, germ, bug - a minute life form (especially a disease-causing bacterium); the term is not in technical use
pathogen - any disease-producing agent (especially a virus or bacterium or other microorganism)
protoctist - any of the unicellular protists
protist, protistan - free-living or colonial organisms with diverse nutritional and reproductive modes
pilus - hairlike structure especially on the surface of a cell or microorganism
virulence, virulency - extreme harmfulness (as the capacity of a microorganism to cause disease); "the virulence of the plague"
transmitter, vector - any agent (person or animal or microorganism) that carries and transmits a disease; "mosquitos are vectors of malaria and yellow fever"; "fleas are vectors of the plague"; "aphids are transmitters of plant diseases"; "when medical scientists talk about vectors they are usually talking about insects"
microflora - microscopic plants; bacteria are often considered to be microflora
bacteremia, bacteriaemia, bacteriemia - transient presence of bacteria (or other microorganisms) in the blood

microorganism

also micro-organism
noun
A minute organism usually producing disease:
Translations
mikroorganismus
mikroorganisme
mikro-organismi
מיקרואורגניזם
mikroorganizam
mikroorganisme
微生物

microorganism

[ˈmaɪkrəʊˈɔːgənɪzəm] Nmicroorganismo m

microorganism

[ˌmaɪkrəʊˈɔːgəˌnɪzm] nmicroorganismo

mi·cro·or·gan·ism

n. microorganismo, organismo que no puede verse a simple vista.

microorganism

n microorganismo, microbio
References in periodicals archive ?
So for a single celled organism that has acquired damage that cannot be repaired, which of the two alternatives is better -- to split the cellular damage in equal amounts between the two daughters or to give one daughter all of the damage and the other none?
Morphotek has developed a broad patent estate that covers the regulation of this process in single celled organisms such as bacteria, yeast and mammalian cells as well as in more complex multicellular organisms such as rodents and plants using a variety of protein and small chemical inhibitors of the mismatch repair process.
The scientists, from the University of Plymouth and the University of Santa Catarina, Brazil, studied a single celled organisms called Foraminifera around volcanic carbon dioxide vents off Naples in Italy.

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