single parent

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Related to Single-parent family: blended family, extended family

single parent

n
(Sociology)
a. a person who has a dependent child or dependent children and who is widowed, divorced, or unmarried
b. (as modifier): a single-parent family.
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations
أُحادي الوالدين، ذو والدٍ واحِدوَالِدٌ وَحِيد
jeden rodičkterý se sám stará o dítěosamělý rodič
eneforsørgereneforsørger-enlig forælder
yksinhuoltaja
samohrani roditelj
gyermekét egyedül nevelõ szülõ
片親で子育てをする人
홀부모
rodič bez partnera so zverenými deťmi
ensamstående förälder
bekar ebeveyntek ana/baba
người nuôi con một mình

single parent

n (mother) → ragazza madre; (father) → ragazzo padre
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

single

(ˈsiŋgl) adjective
1. one only. The spider hung on a single thread.
2. for one person only. a single bed/mattress.
3. unmarried. a single person.
4. for or in one direction only. a single ticket/journey/fare.
noun
1. a gramophone record with only one tune or song on each side. This group have just brought out a new single.
2. a one-way ticket.
ˈsingleness noun
ˈsingles noun plural
1. (also noun singular) in tennis etc, a match or matches with only one player on each side. The men's singles are being played this week; (also adjective) a singles match.
2. (especially American) unmarried (usually young) people. a bar for singles; (also adjective) a singles holiday/club.
ˈsingly adverb
one by one; separately. They came all together, but they left singly.
ˌsingle-ˈbreasted adjective
(of a coat, jacket etc) having only one row of buttons. a single-breasted tweed suit.
ˌsingle-ˈdecker noun, adjective
(a bus etc) having only one deck or level. a single-decker (bus).
ˌsingle-ˈhanded adjective, adverb
working etc by oneself, without help. He runs the restaurant single-handed; single-handed efforts.
single ˈparent noun
a mother or father who brings up a child or children on her or his own. a single-parent family.
single out
to choose or pick out for special treatment. He was singled out to receive special thanks for his help.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

single parent

وَالِدٌ وَحِيد osamělý rodič enlig forælder Alleinerzieher ανύπαντρος γονέας padre solo, padre soltero yksinhuoltaja parent célibataire samohrani roditelj genitore single 片親で子育てをする人 홀부모 alleenstaande ouder aleneforelder samotny ojciec pai que cria filhos sozinho отец-одиночка ensamstående förälder พ่อหรือแม่ที่เลี้ยงลูกด้วยตนเองเพียงคนเดียว bekar ebeveyn người nuôi con một mình 单亲家长
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in periodicals archive ?
Single-parent family getaways to the Caribbean this autumn are now on sale with Virgin Holidays.
If the single-parent family structure adversely affects children's educational outcomes, then the difference in trends across income groups could possibly account for more of the growing gap in educational attainment between rich and poor children than income inequality itself.
The 22-year-old who comes from a single-parent family herself, said: "Last year I was doing an assignment and this topic kept cropping up in a lot of the journals I was reading.
The Single-Parent Family Study was a survey designed to compare the experiences of single and married mothers.
As it is observed in the above table the mean and the standard deviation of the parents' violence against children in normal family groups are 46.77 and 16.93, and in the single-parent family groups are 65.13 and 24.14, respectively.
For the purpose of identiffing families with children, we adopt the conventional "demographic" definition: two cohabiting adults with children under the age of 18 are defined as a two-parent family, and a single adult living with one or more of his or her children under 18 constitutes a single-parent family. As recommended for measures of poverty, we use the LIS equivalence scale to standardize for family size by dividing disposable income by the square root of family size.
So all we are going to be left with is another single-parent family being paid for by the state.

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