Sinify

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Related to Sinification: Significant figures

Si·ni·fy

 (sī′nə-fī′, sĭn′ə-)
tr.v. Si·ni·fied, Si·ni·fy·ing, Si·ni·fies
To Sinicize.

[Late Latin Sīnae, the Chinese; see Sino- + -fy.]

Si′ni·fi·ca′tion (-fĭ-kā′shən) n.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Uighurs regard the `innovation' as 'sinification' intended to separate Chinese Islam from global Islam.
The real aim of the so-called de-radicalisation is to eliminate faith and thoroughly carry out Sinification," he said.
471-99), the most "Sinophilic" Tuoba monarch, who moved the Northern Wei capital to Luoyang and initiated wholesale Sinification reforms.
The Ryukyuans responded to Japan's subjugation of their kingdom by increasing their efforts at sinification in order to maintain the idea of their kingdom's political autonomy (83).
In the last year or two, however, the PRC has pushed for greater assimilation of minorities and the Sinification of religions such as Islam and Christianity.
Known as the Sinification of Marxism, or "making Marxism Chinese," Mao's canon inaugurated the new revolutionary phase of Chinese Exceptionalism.
Religion in China has to follow the principle of "Sinification" under the guidance of the party, he added.
While the People's Republic has, in a positive move, delayed the action, as reports coming out of China indicate, believers of all faiths have come across restrictions, as the Communist Party seeks 'Sinification' of religion.
"Ethnic Chinese in Contemporary Indonesia: Changing Identity Politics and the Paradox of Sinification".
reflect their own identity, or resist the sinification of their culture.
The notion of "sinification of Marxism" gives Mao the ideological legitimacy to lead the CCP and enhances his ethos among party members.
The interaction between Han and native ethnic minorities led to sinification, a process whereby ethnic minorities come under the influence of dominant Han Chinese.