Siraj-ud-daula


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Siraj-ud-daula

(sɪˈrɑːdʒʊdˈdaʊlə)
n
(Biography) ?1728–57, Indian leader who became the Great Mogul's deputy in Bengal (1756); opponent of English colonization. He captured Calcutta (1756) from the English and many of his prisoners suffocated in a crowded room that became known as the Black Hole of Calcutta. He was defeated (1757) by a group of Indian nobles in alliance with Robert Clive
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Noun1.Siraj-ud-daula - Indian general and nawab of Bengal who opposed the colonization of India by England; he captured Calcutta in 1756 and many of his prisoners suffocated in a crowded room that became known as the Black Hole of Calcutta; he was defeated at the battle of Plassey by a group of Indian nobles in alliance with Robert Clive (1728-1757)
References in periodicals archive ?
Clive, just 32 years old, defeated Siraj-ud-Daula at Plassey on 23 June 1757.
The Quaid-i-Azam shield for the best All Round Performance was awarded to Siraj-ud-Daula House, the Champion House for the year 2017.
After the defeat of Siraj-ud-daula at the Battle of Plassey in 1757, and the establishment of Calcutta as the capital of the British East India Company, the drawing of India into the ambit of what would in the 19th century be called "the empire over which the sun never set" was achieved by overt and covert means.
Because of the intrigues and betrayal of Mir Jaafar, Siraj-ud-Daula was defeated by the British in the Battle of Plassy on 22nd June, 1757, and was executed.