green alder

(redirected from Sitka Alder)
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Related to Sitka Alder: green alder, red alder, Alnus sinuata
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Noun1.green alder - North American shrub with light green leaves and winged nutsgreen alder - North American shrub with light green leaves and winged nuts
Alnus, genus Alnus - alders
alder tree, alder - north temperate shrubs or trees having toothed leaves and conelike fruit; bark is used in tanning and dyeing and the wood is rot-resistant
2.green alder - shrub of mountainous areas of Europegreen alder - shrub of mountainous areas of Europe
Alnus, genus Alnus - alders
alder tree, alder - north temperate shrubs or trees having toothed leaves and conelike fruit; bark is used in tanning and dyeing and the wood is rot-resistant
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Translations
pensasleppä
References in periodicals archive ?
sitchensis, respectively]), and only occasionally on black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa), sweetgale (Myrica gale), and Sitka alder (Alnus viridis sinuata) (MacCracken et al.
Specifically, we were interested in the following questions: (1) does the level of damage by Black Bears differ between male and female Black Cottonwood trees; (2) does the size of the Black Cottonwood tree affect the level of catkin and seed pod harvest by Black Bears; (3) what is the potential nutrient value of male and female Black Cottonwood catkins and of seed pods; and (4) what is the nutritional composition of Black Cottonwood catkins and seed pods compared to some other potential plant foods that are present in the area in spring, namely male catkins of Sitka Alder (Alnus viridis sinuata), which apparently are not eaten, and stem-bases of Northern Ground Cone (Boschniakia rossi), which are frequently eaten?
Red alder is not to be confused with Sitka alder, which is a bushy plant.
These included sitka alder (Alnus sinuata), western larch (Larix occidentalis), whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulus), lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta), and--most important for the expedition--ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa).