size-weight illusion


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size-weight illusion

n
(Psychology) a standard sense illusion that a small object is heavier than a large object of the same weight
References in periodicals archive ?
Interestingly, other studies in the Goodale lab have shown that blind expert echolocators are also subject to illusions, for example the size-weight illusion in which the perception of mass is influenced by the size of an object.
The study has shown that the well-established size-weight illusion, where a person who is holding two objects of equal weight will consider the larger object to be much lighter, is more than just curious or interesting, but a necessary precursor to humans' ability to learn to throw-and to throw far.
Bingham and Zhu put their theory to the test, recruiting 12 adult men and women to perform various tests related to perception, the size-weight illusion and throwing prowess.
Another way of stating the size-weight illusion is that for someone to perceive that two objects-one larger than the other-weigh the same, the larger object must weigh significantly more than the smaller object.
This phenomenon is commonly known as the size-weight illusion and has been studied extensively since the work of Charpentier (1891).
Numerous psychophysical experiments have shown that the perception of heaviness is a function of mass and size--that is, the perception is subject to the size-weight illusion (Jones, 1986).
Research has shown that the size-weight illusion exists in almost all individuals who are capable of lifting.
The present studies investigate the psychophysics of the size-weight illusion in a novel style of lifting: team lifting.
The fact that the size-weight illusion is present in so many circumstances suggests that it may play a role when individuals lift heavy containers in an industrial lifting situation.
Lifters experiencing a size-weight illusion could be subject to increased risk for injury.
That's what two Canadian psychologists conclude after investigating the size-weight illusion, an error that arises when people try to estimate the weights of two objects of different sizes but the same mass.
Some researchers have demonstrated that a size-weight illusion exists in industrial lifting tasks (Luczak & Ge, 1989).