skin effect

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skin effect

n.
The tendency of alternating current to flow near the surface of a conductor.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

skin effect

n
(Electronics) the tendency of alternating current to concentrate in the surface layer of a conductor, esp at high frequencies, thus increasing its effective resistance
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

skin′ effect`


n.
the phenomenon in which an alternating current tends to concentrate in the outer layer of a conductor, resulting in increased resistance.
[1895–1900]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.skin effect - the tendency of high-frequency alternating current to distribute near the surface of a conductor
electrical phenomenon - a physical phenomenon involving electricity
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Due to skin depth effect and the motion of the dipoles in the dielectrics, higher frequencies are attenuated more than lower frequencies.
To first order, the conductor loss is frequency dependent due to skin depth effects, which forces currents mostly into the circumference of the signal trace and return path.
Equation 4 gives the effective or skin resistance of the transmission line taking into account the high frequency skin depth effects. Finally, the transmission line attenuation due to conductor loss is given by