slacker

(redirected from Slacker generation)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

slack·er

 (slăk′ər)
n.
1. One who shirks work or responsibility.
2. One who tries to evade military service in wartime; a draft dodger.

slacker

(ˈslækə)
n
1. a person who evades work or duty; shirker
2. informal
a. an educated young adult characterized by cynicism and apathy
b. (as modifier): slacker culture.

slack•er

(ˈslæk ər)

n.
1. a person who evades duty or work; shirker.
2. a person who evades military service; dodger.
3. an esp. educated young person who is scornful of materialism, purposeless, apathetic, and usu. works in a dead-end job.
[1790–1800; definition 3 popularized by Slackers (1991), film by R. Linklater]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.slacker - a person who shirks his work or duty (especially one who tries to evade military service in wartime)slacker - a person who shirks his work or duty (especially one who tries to evade military service in wartime)
armed forces, armed services, military, military machine, war machine - the military forces of a nation; "their military is the largest in the region"; "the military machine is the same one we faced in 1991 but now it is weaker"
goldbrick - a soldier who performs his duties without proper care or effort
do-nothing, idler, layabout, loafer, bum - person who does no work; "a lazy bum"
malingerer, shammer, skulker - someone shirking their duty by feigning illness or incapacity
scrimshanker - a shirker

slacker

noun layabout, shirker, loafer, skiver (Brit. slang), idler, passenger, do-nothing, piker (Austral. & N.Z. slang), dodger, good-for-nothing, bludger (Austral. & N.Z. informal), gold brick (U.S. slang), scrimshanker (Brit. military slang) He's not a slacker, he's the best worker they've got.
Translations

slacker

[ˈslækəʳ] Nholgazán/ana m/f, vago/a m/f, gandul(a) m/f

slacker

[ˈslækər] nfainéant(e) m/fslack-jawed [ˌslækˈdʒɔːd] adjbouche bée inv

slacker

nBummelant(in) m(f)

slacker

[ˈslækəʳ] n (fam) → lavativo/a, pelandrone/a
References in periodicals archive ?
Once called the "slacker generation," Generation X adults born between 1965 and 1979 are now active, happy and achieving a work--life balance, according to Purchasing Power's "Guide to Generation X- Working with Them and Engaging Them."
So, I hear you ask, how does that earlier generation's hardship absolve my slacker generation? Nocera's point was this: Just as in other areas of psychology, people form their attitudes about money and finances from their experiences at an early age.
I've never liked the smug and condescending moniker "Slacker Generation." Call a Gen Xer a "slacker" and you might find yourself wanting to rename this cohort the "Smacker Generation." Many in this group, who are struggling to support their children and their aging parents, are hardly slacking off.
They are now being dubbed more of the cynical generation rather than the slacker generation.
Unlike many older observers, however, she does not blame this on a slacker generation of adults kids who prefer to leech off their parents and avoid long-term commitments to relationships or real estate.
"There's this slacker generation whose immigrant parents worked hard and made money, and their kids are running around in souped-up BMW M3s and cabriolets and they don't really need to work."
The so-called 'slacker generation' defined by bands like Nirvana during the early 1990s were apparently interested in very little - and don't even mention work, let alone getting a real job.