slave ship

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slave ship

n
(Historical Terms) a ship used to transport slaves, esp formerly from Africa to the New World
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.slave ship - a ship used to transport slaves from their homes to places of bondageslave ship - a ship used to transport slaves from their homes to places of bondage
ship - a vessel that carries passengers or freight
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
In the slave quarters, and even later, I heard whispered conversations among the coloured people of the tortures which the slaves, including, no doubt, my ancestors on my mother's side, suffered in the middle passage of the slave ship while being conveyed from Africa to America.
In a pirate, man-of-war, or slave ship, when the captain is rowed anywhere in his boat, he always sits in the stern sheets on a comfortable, sometimes cushioned seat there, and often steers himself with a pretty little milliner's tiller decorated with gay cords and ribbons.
What a red rag is to a bull, Turner's "Slave Ship" was to me, before I studied art.
which attracted me most did not remind me of the Slave Ship.
However, Walter Clemons argues that, since the murdered baby could not have remembered passage on a slave ship, "Beloved is also a ghost from the slave ships of Sethe's ancestry" (75).
Nor was this significance restricted to metaphor; English adventurers pirated Portuguese slave ships, and English women wore jewels from Africa.
THE human cargo the slave ships carried were sold off like cattle when they reached their destination.
The haunting song "Slave Ships" is a list of slave ship names.
Nielsen might well have mentioned Homer, too, as the ironic progenitor of the catalogue of slave ships which opens the poem.
More than 200 years ago, slave ships were particularly unhealthy.
More importantly, this relates break dancing to, among other things, Caribbean limbo, said by tradition to have been born in the cramped holds of the slave ships. Like any other such black negotiation of shrunken space (think of Henry "Box" Brown, Harriet Jacobs's garret and so forth), break dancing understands cramp as embryonic sprawl, embryonic spring.