slave ship

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slave ship

n
(Historical Terms) a ship used to transport slaves, esp formerly from Africa to the New World
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Noun1.slave ship - a ship used to transport slaves from their homes to places of bondageslave ship - a ship used to transport slaves from their homes to places of bondage
ship - a vessel that carries passengers or freight
References in periodicals archive ?
I knotted deep inside the rocking hull of the slaveship I the castrated darkness I whisper across seabones and lynched flowers; there are mysteries and ancestral movements here, I am the subject of someone's magic; {Hoodoo Hollerin' Bebop Gbost.
In the case of Penny Lane the issue is more uncertain, but it is thought the street bears the name of James Penny, a slaveship owner who opposed the abolition of slavery.
By engaging the history of slavery through humor in the play's first scene, "Celebrity Slaveship," Wolfe joins a long line of black writers and artists who have employed satire to political ends, beginning in the nineteenth century and extending through the contemporary moment.
If they would make the best of their condition, a slaveship could be a happy ship.
As Citizen envisions himself chained in the hold of a slaveship, Aunt Ester explains:
1783 John Lee, the UK's solicitor-general, commenting on the Zong Atrocity in which 133 Africans had been flung into the sea from the Liverpool slaveship, Zong, captained by Luke Collingwood, insists: "This is a case of chattels or goods.
curator of The Henrietta Marie: A Slaveship Speaks.
Niagara in the Mediterranean (1858), and returned to Africa with 271 slaves liberated from the slaveship Echo; in Washington, D.
Parks' obfuscating take on the harsh historical record of slavery is more novelty than originality, not hardly the uniqueness, or otherwise inventive exposition of the slave reality in Amiri Baraka's galvanic ritual drama, Slaveship, or even Robert Lowell's poetic dramatization of Melville's Benito Cereno.
The author of the words was Liverpool's surveyor of tides John Newton, the self-proclaimed wretch who once was lost but then was found, the slaveship master who became a campaigner to end the slave trade.
John Lee, Solicitor-General, UK, commenting in 1783 on the Zong Atrocity in which 133 Africans had been flung into the sea from the Liverpool slaveship, Zong, captained by Luke Collingwood:
Some of the highlights of this section include its introduction of the fact that the slaveship captains were often elevated to a higher social status after having made great profits in the slave trade and its revelation that "the long march," the transportation of African captives from the inland to the coast, "became the first of several life-threatening migrations for the African captives" well before they had to face the ordeal of the Middle Passage.