Slavic


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Slav·ic

 (slä′vĭk)
adj.
1. Of or relating to the Slavs or their languages.
2. Of or relating to the branch of the Indo-European language family that includes such languages as Russian, Serbo-Croatian, and Polish, and is composed of the East Slavic, South Slavic, and West Slavic subdivisions.
n.
The Slavic branch of Indo-European.

Slavic

(ˈslɑːvɪk)
n, adj
1. (Languages) another word (esp US) for Slavonic
2. (Peoples) another word (esp US) for Slavonic

Slav•ic

(ˈslɑ vɪk, ˈslæv ɪk)

n.
1. a family of languages, a branch of the Indo-European family, that includes Polish, Czech, Serbo-Croatian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, and Russian. Compare East Slavic, South Slavic, West Slavic.
adj.
2. of or pertaining to Slavic or its speakers.
3. of or pertaining to the Slavs: Slavic customs.
[1805–15]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Slavic - a branch of the Indo-European family of languages
Balto-Slavic, Balto-Slavic language, Balto-Slavonic - a family of Indo-European languages including the Slavic and Baltic languages
Church Slavic, Old Bulgarian, Old Church Slavic, Old Church Slavonic - the Slavic language into which the Bible was translated in the 9th century
Russian - the Slavic language that is the official language of Russia
Belarusian, Byelorussian, White Russian - the Slavic language spoken in Belarus
Ukrainian - the Slavic language spoken in the Ukraine
Polish - the Slavic language of Poland
Slovak - the Slavic language spoken in Slovakia
Czech - the Slavic language of Czechs
Slovene - the Slavic language of Slovenes
Serbo-Croat, Serbo-Croatian - the Slavic language of the Serbs and Croats; the Serbian dialect is usually written in the Cyrillic alphabet and the Croatian dialect is usually written in the Roman alphabet
Lusatian, Sorbian - a Slavonic language spoken in rural area of southeastern Germany
Macedonian - the Slavic language of modern Macedonia
Bulgarian - a Slavic language spoken in Bulgaria
Adj.1.Slavic - of or relating to Slavic languages
Translations
slovanský

Slavic

[ˈslɑːvɪk]
A. ADJeslavo
B. N (Ling) → eslavo m

Slavic

[ˈslɑːvɪk] adjslave

Slavic

adjslawisch
ndas Slawische
References in classic literature ?
She has a broad Slavic face, with prominent red cheeks.
Maslenitsa is an Eastern Slavic religious and folk holiday, celebrated during the last week before Great Lent, that is, the eighth week before Eastern Orthodox Pascha.
We as Alliance, are against a Slavic name, just as we used to be against the name "Slavo-Macedonia" before.
Linguists provide an overview of the last 20 years of Slavonic Studies at the University of Leipzig, and call special attention to the successful periods in the history of Slavic linguistics when it worked on the same methodological basis as general linguistics and in close cooperation with it.
Naydan, "Adventures in the Slavic Kitchen: A Book of Essays with Recipes" by Igor Klekh will have immense and special appeal for academia and non-specialist general readers with an interest in contemporary Russian culinary culture.
Usually, the topic is given a short overview at best, which is also the case in the fine new book on Slavic Nominal Word-Formation by Ranko Matasovic (2014: 183-189).
Tablet contributor Cherie Woodworth profiled one of the researchers, Paul Wexler, in 2014, writing that "[he] has been marshaling his arguments for two decades to make the radical, implausible, impossible argument that Yiddish did not come from Germany but from the Slavic lands, and the East European Jews came not from the Rhineland but from Persia via the Caucasus and the Khazar steppe.
Before the 1 November 1931 launch of Toronto's Borba, Croatian and other South Slavic immigrants in Canada who were supporters of the working class, members of trade-unions, or were CPC sympathizers or members, relied on the immigrant press published south of the border.
The MP demanded from the Rector of the Kyrgyz-Russian Slavic University and Education Minister Sadykov to enroll those 27 university applicants.
This is only the most recent environmental disadvantage for the Slavic Village community.
There are at least two Slavic translations of Agapetus, one as early as the 11th century and another found in 16th-century manuscripts, both most easily available in Lobakova's study and publication