Slavic


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Slav·ic

 (slä′vĭk)
adj.
1. Of or relating to the Slavs or their languages.
2. Of or relating to the branch of the Indo-European language family that includes such languages as Russian, Serbo-Croatian, and Polish, and is composed of the East Slavic, South Slavic, and West Slavic subdivisions.
n.
The Slavic branch of Indo-European.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Slavic

(ˈslɑːvɪk)
n, adj
1. (Languages) another word (esp US) for Slavonic
2. (Peoples) another word (esp US) for Slavonic
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Slav•ic

(ˈslɑ vɪk, ˈslæv ɪk)

n.
1. a family of languages, a branch of the Indo-European family, that includes Polish, Czech, Serbo-Croatian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, and Russian. Compare East Slavic, South Slavic, West Slavic.
adj.
2. of or pertaining to Slavic or its speakers.
3. of or pertaining to the Slavs: Slavic customs.
[1805–15]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Slavic - a branch of the Indo-European family of languages
Balto-Slavic, Balto-Slavic language, Balto-Slavonic - a family of Indo-European languages including the Slavic and Baltic languages
Church Slavic, Old Bulgarian, Old Church Slavic, Old Church Slavonic - the Slavic language into which the Bible was translated in the 9th century
Russian - the Slavic language that is the official language of Russia
Belarusian, Byelorussian, White Russian - the Slavic language spoken in Belarus
Ukrainian - the Slavic language spoken in the Ukraine
Polish - the Slavic language of Poland
Slovak - the Slavic language spoken in Slovakia
Czech - the Slavic language of Czechs
Slovene - the Slavic language of Slovenes
Serbo-Croat, Serbo-Croatian - the Slavic language of the Serbs and Croats; the Serbian dialect is usually written in the Cyrillic alphabet and the Croatian dialect is usually written in the Roman alphabet
Lusatian, Sorbian - a Slavonic language spoken in rural area of southeastern Germany
Macedonian - the Slavic language of modern Macedonia
Bulgarian - a Slavic language spoken in Bulgaria
Adj.1.Slavic - of or relating to Slavic languages
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
slovanský

Slavic

[ˈslɑːvɪk]
A. ADJeslavo
B. N (Ling) → eslavo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Slavic

[ˈslɑːvɪk] adjslave
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Slavic

adjslawisch
ndas Slawische
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
She has a broad Slavic face, with prominent red cheeks.
Kyrgyz-Russian Slavic University named after Boris Yeltsin is a university which is jointly operated by the Kyrgyz government and the Government of Russia, located in city of Bishkek, the capital of the Kyrgyzstan.
In February 2019, a 20-year-old female student of the Kyrgyz-Russian Slavic University reported harassment to police against her university teacher.
The axe the Slavic woman was buried with resembled tools from the southern Baltic, which includes modern countries bordering the Baltic Sea such as Germany, Lithuania and Poland.
The guests enjoyed ancient Slavic dances, tasted traditional treats, including a symbol of Maslenitsa -- pancakes.
I do not believe that the Albanians will accept to be citizens of a pure Slavic state," said Panos Kammenos, Minister of Defense of Greece.
Naydan, "Adventures in the Slavic Kitchen: A Book of Essays with Recipes" by Igor Klekh will have immense and special appeal for academia and non-specialist general readers with an interest in contemporary Russian culinary culture.
Usually, the topic is given a short overview at best, which is also the case in the fine new book on Slavic Nominal Word-Formation by Ranko Matasovic (2014: 183-189).
The Day of the Salonica brothers Cyril and Methodius, the Slavic educators and creators of the first Slavic alphabet, is celebrated on 24 May.
I've often heard Yiddish, the language of Ashkenazi Jews for more than a millennium, described simplistically and somewhat inaccurately, as "German with Hebrew characters." But researchers from England, Israel, and the United States now argue that the language may have originated in Turkey, rather than anywhere near Germany, and may be more Slavic than German.
The sixth resolution was dedicated to language-based mass organizations and it underscored that Slavic and other immigrant workers constituted "an important and integral part of the Canadian working class." The resolution stressed that Slavic immigrants were employed in all sectors of heavy industry and were among "the most exploited" workers in the country.