latency

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Related to Sleep latency: MSLT

la·ten·cy

 (lāt′n-sē)
n. pl. la·ten·cies
1. The state or quality of being latent.
2. Psychology The latency period.
3. A latent period.
4. The time interval between initiating a query, transmission, or process, and receiving or detecting the results, often given as an average value over a large number of events.

la•ten•cy

(ˈleɪt n si)

n., pl. -cies.
1. the state of being latent.
[1630–40]

latency

The time period between a request for a network to perform an action and the action being carried out.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.latency - (computer science) the time it takes for a specific block of data on a data track to rotate around to the read/write head
computer science, computing - the branch of engineering science that studies (with the aid of computers) computable processes and structures
access time - (computer science) the interval between the time data is requested by the system and the time the data is provided by the drive; "access time is the sum of seek time and rotational latency and command processing overhead"
interval, time interval - a definite length of time marked off by two instants
2.latency - the time that elapses between a stimulus and the response to it
interval, time interval - a definite length of time marked off by two instants
3.latency - the state of being not yet evident or active
potential, potentiality, potency - the inherent capacity for coming into being

latency

noun
The condition of being temporarily inactive:
Translations
latencezpoždění
latenssiviive
レイテンシ

latency

[ˈleɪtənsɪ] Nestado m latente

latency

nLatenz f

la·ten·cy

n. latencia, acto de permanecer latente;
___ periodperíodo de ___.
References in periodicals archive ?
Krishnamurthy and his colleagues reported sleep latency, sleep duration, sleep dysfunction, sleep efficiency in percentage, sleep quality, and medication need as assessed by the PSQI, as well as the overall PSQI score.
The continuing effort to evaluate the tendency to fall asleep in the daytime eventually led to the development and validation of the Multiple Sleep Latency Test.
Research Results and Conclusions Data from sleep diaries showed large effect size (a measure of difference between two factors) of sleep location-underwater or on the surface-on sleep efficiency-the ratio of total sleep time to total time in bed-with sleep efficiency being somewhat lower underwater compared to surface levels, and on sleep onset latency-the time to go from wake to sleep-with greater sleep latency underwater compared to surface levels.
In large doses, caeine can increase blood pressure, which in turn, can be associated with strokes, and cerebral vascular disease, as well as increase insomnia and sleep latency.
Compared with the printed book, the e-book also significantly increased sleep latency (10 minutes longer), decreased REM sleep by 11 minutes, decreased evening sleepiness, and increased morning sleepiness.
According to research results, sleep health training differentiated the intervention group from the control group in terms of scores given to subjective sleep quality, sleep latency, sleep disturbances, daytime dysfunction, and the total scores of sleep quality.
Overnight polysomnography and next-day multiple sleep latency tests represent the most commonly used sleep studies usually reserved for cases of insomnia with an organic cause.
Both BPNE and EU at doses >100 mg/kg induced spontaneous hypnosis with loss of righting reflex, significantly decreased sleep latency (SL) and also increased total sleeping time (TST) dose-dependently.
The following sleep parameters were examined for every 24-h period and per sleep episode (automatically calculated from the software): 1) Actual sleep time--sleep start to sleep end minus wake time; 2) Sleep efficiency--the percentage of time spent asleep from sleep onset calculated by ((sleep duration--wake time)/sleep duration) x 100); 3) Sleep latency (time from bed time to sleep onset); and 4) Percentage moving time--the time spent moving as a percentage of the assumed sleep time, which is derived from the number of epochs where scores greater than zero were recorded ((sum of duration of moving time epochs > 0)/sleep duration) x 100) and is an indicator of restlessness.
A recent study with 122 children, roughly half of whom had an anxiety or depressive disorder, compared children's parent-reported CBCL sleep item scores with a sleep diary, actigraphy, and two nights of polysomnography (described later in the article), and discovered that only one of the six items, trouble sleeping, correlated significantly with one objective measure, sleep latency as measured by diary (partial correlation = .