night terror

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Related to Sleep terrors: sleep paralysis

night terror

n.
An episode of nighttime arousal from sleep, accompanied by intense fear and agitation and not recalled after awakening. Night terrors are more common in children than in adults. Also called sleep terror.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

night′ ter`ror


n.
a sudden feeling of extreme fear that awakens a sleeping person and is not associated with a dream.
[1895–1900]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.night terror - an emotional episode (usually in young children) in which the person awakens in terror with feelings of anxiety and fear but is unable to remember any incident that might have provoked those feelings
dramatic event, drama - an episode that is turbulent or highly emotional
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References in periodicals archive ?
These are sleep disorders that are caused by abnormal sleeping behavior, such as sleepwalking, nightmares, teeth grinding, sleep paralysis, sleep terrors, and others.
QUESTION: My seven-year-old daughter has sleep terrors. What causes this, and when can we expect them to be finished?
Dubai: Though sleep terrors and sleep walking are associated with school-going children they are not the only ones affected by it.
The permanently disqualifying nature of sleep terrors will similarly be reflected in the update."
They discuss typical sleep across development and healthy sleep habits, common pediatric problems, and key concepts for behavioral sleep medicine; clinical assessment of sleep and working with families to increase treatment success; and the problems of sleep-onset associations and night wakings, bedtime stalling, nighttime fears, anxiety, recurrent nightmares, insomnia, delayed sleep-wake phase, confusional arousals, sleep terrors, sleepwalking, nocturnal enuresis, and nonadherence to positive airway pressure therapy.
But when they arrived the man told them about his sleep terrors.
Sleep terrors typically are observed in children between the ages of 4 and 12 and tend to resolve spontaneously.
Children at this age present with sleep terrors or confusional arousals, as well as moving around the bed in restless sleep in order to maintain their airway.
The DSM-IV also indicates that 80 percent of individuals who sleepwalk have a family history of sleepwalking and sleep terrors. (80) Thus, investigators should interview the suspect's parents and/or siblings about a family history of parasomnias.
In this guide for general readers, Foldvary-Schafer (Sleep Disorders Center, Cleveland Clinic, and neurology, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve U.) presents information on sleep disorders, including how to recognize them, what happens during a sleep study and what the results look like, and diagnosis, treatment, and example cases of the most common disorders: obstructive sleep apnea, narcolepsy, restless legs syndrome, psychophysiological insomnia, sleep terrors, rapid eye movement behavior disorder, circadian rhythm disorders, and those affecting children, teens, and people over 50.
Results indicate that adolescents with a childhood diagnosis of ADHD, regardless of persistent ADHD were more likely to have current sleep problems and sleep disorders such as insomnia, sleep terrors, nightmares, bruxism and snoring.