insomnia

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Related to Sleepless night: insomnia

in·som·ni·a

 (ĭn-sŏm′nē-ə)
n.
Chronic inability to fall asleep or remain asleep for an adequate length of time.

[Latin īnsomnia, from īnsomnis, sleepless : in-, not; see in-1 + somnus, sleep; see swep- in Indo-European roots.]

insomnia

(ɪnˈsɒmnɪə)
n
chronic inability to fall asleep or to enjoy uninterrupted sleep.
[C18: from Latin, from insomnis sleepless, from somnus sleep]
inˈsomnious adj

in•som•ni•a

(ɪnˈsɒm ni ə)

n.
difficulty in falling or staying asleep, esp. when chronic.
[1685–95; < Latin, derivative of insomn(is) sleepless =in- in-3 + somnus sleep]
in•som′ni•ac`, n., adj.

insomnia

Difficulty in falling or staying asleep. It can be caused by stress, drinking too much coffee, or taking too little exercise, or it may be a symptom of a physical or mental disorder.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.insomnia - an inability to sleep; chronic sleeplessness
sleep disorder - a disturbance of the normal sleep pattern
hypersomnia - an inability to stay awake

insomnia

noun sleeplessness, restlessness, wakefulness For some people, insomnia is a chronic affliction.
Related words
adjective agrypnotic
Translations
أَرَقٌأرَق
nespavost
søvnløshed
unettomuus
nesanica
svefnleysi
不眠症
불면증
blogai miegantisnemiga
bezmiegs
besanicanesanica
sömnlöshet
โรคนอนไม่หลับ
chứng mất ngủ

insomnia

[ɪnˈsɒmnɪə] Ninsomnio m

insomnia

[ɪnˈsɒmniə] ninsomnie f
to suffer from insomnia → souffrir d'insomnie

insomnia

insomnia

[ɪnˈsɒmnɪə] ninsonnia

insomnia

(inˈsomniə) noun
inability to sleep. She takes sleeping-pills as she suffers from insomnia.
inˈsomniac (-ak) noun, adjective
(of) a person who suffers from insomnia.

insomnia

أَرَقٌ nespavost søvnløshed Schlaflosigkeit αϋπνία insomnio unettomuus insomnie nesanica insonnia 不眠症 불면증 slapeloosheid søvnløshet bezsenność insónia, insônia бессонница sömnlöshet โรคนอนไม่หลับ uykusuzluk chứng mất ngủ 失眠

in·som·ni·a

n. insomnio, desvelo.

insomnia

n insomnio
References in classic literature ?
Amidst these thoughts, poor Jones passed a long sleepless night, and in the morning the result of the whole was to abide by Molly, and to think no more of Sophia.
When he got out of the train at Petersburg, he felt after his sleepless night as keen and fresh as after a cold bath.
Often when she woke Jo found Beth reading in her well-worn little book, heard her singing softly, to beguile the sleepless night, or saw her lean her face upon her hands, while slow tears dropped through the transparent fingers, and Jo would lie watching her with thoughts too deep for tears, feeling that Beth, in her simple, unselfish way, was trying to wean herself from the dear old life, and fit herself for the life to come, by sacred words of comfort, quiet prayers, and the music she loved so well.
I had better have let it wait till morning, for it gave me a second sleepless night.
There is nothing so refreshing after a sleepless night as a cup of this delicious Russian tea," Lorrain was saying with an air of restrained animation as he stood sipping tea from a delicate Chinese handleless cup before a table on which tea and a cold supper were laid in the small circular room.
He was very pale and his face bore the marks of the preceding sleepless night.
Morison had spent an almost sleepless night of nervous apprehension and doubts and fears.
Rolling the hair on leads or papers was a favorite method of attaining the desired result, and though it often entailed a sleepless night, there were those who gladly paid the price.
It would have spared her, she thought, one sleepless night out of two.
Meanwhile Robert, addressing Mrs Pontellier, continued to tell of his one time hopeless passion for Madame Ratignolle; of sleepless nights, of consuming flames till the very sea sizzled when he took his daily plunge.
Shall we allow him to carry to Haarlem the fruit of our labour, the fruit of our sleepless nights, the child of our love?
She had not suffered so much from a want of food, however, as from a want of air and exercise; from unremitting, wasting toil at a sedentary occupation, from hope deferred and from sleepless nights.