sleight of hand

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sleight of hand

n. pl. sleights of hand
1.
a. The performance of or skill in performing juggling or magic tricks so quickly and deftly that the manner of execution cannot be observed; legerdemain.
b. A trick or set of tricks performed in this way.
2.
a. Deception or trickery: made the program appear affordable by statistical sleight of hand.
b. A deceptive or misleading act.

sleight of hand

n
1. (Theatre) manual dexterity used in performing conjuring tricks
2. (Theatre) the performance of such tricks

sleight′ of hand′


n.
1. skill in feats requiring quick and clever movements of the hands, esp. for entertainment or deception; legerdemain.
2. the performance of such feats.
3. any such feat; a magic or conjuring trick.
4. skill in deception.
[1350–1400]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sleight of hand - manual dexterity in the execution of tricks
conjuring trick, legerdemain, magic trick, thaumaturgy, magic, deception, conjuration, illusion, trick - an illusory feat; considered magical by naive observers

sleight of hand

sleight of hand

noun
The use of skillful tricks and deceptions to produce entertainingly baffling effects:
References in classic literature ?
The conversation had turned to the subject of sleight-of-hand and the feats of the prestidigitateurs, one of whom was then exhibiting at a local theatre.
But the pulling of them apart and pushing them together again was only a sleight-of-hand trick.
The exception I speak of was the wonderful Wizard of Oz, a sleight-of-hand performer from Omaha who went up in a balloon and was carried by a current of air to the Emerald City.
The old sleight-of-hand expert had stolen it, sure, and slipped it under his robe.
It is needless to say that no sleight-of-hand performer, however expert, unless aided by the powers of darkness, could have accomplished this feat; but a luckless child in the pursuit of virtue had done it with a turn of the wrist.
Some sleight-of-hand trick or other,' said the Medical Man, and Filby tried to tell us about a conjurer he had seen at Burslem; but before he had finished his preface the Time Traveller came back, and Filby's anecdote collapsed.
Among his various eccentric habits he had a humorous one of always cheating at cards, which rendered necessary on his part, not only a close observance of the game, and a sleight-of-hand in counting and scoring, but also involved the constant correction, by looks, and frowns, and kicks under the table, of Richard Swiveller, who being bewildered by the rapidity with which his cards were told, and the rate at which the pegs travelled down the board, could not be prevented from sometimes expressing his surprise and incredulity.
Presently entering the Ti, he seats himself on the mats as composedly as a juggler about to perform his sleight-of-hand tricks; and with the chiefs disposed in a circle around him, commences his ceremony.
And I lean the more to this opinion from finding that even the historian of those exploits, with all his partiality for his hero, is fain to admit that the slaughtered monsters in question were of a very innocent and simple turn; extremely guileless and ready of belief; lending a credulous ear to the most improbable tales; suffering themselves to be easily entrapped into pits; and even (as in the case of the Welsh Giant) with an excess of the hospitable politeness of a landlord, ripping themselves open, rather than hint at the possibility of their guests being versed in the vagabond arts of sleight-of-hand and hocus-pocus.
Thoughtful men will not spend their lives acquiring sleight-of-hand.
Boundary-Breaking Magician stars Ben Hart, a sleight-of-hand artist.
Smith should have notched his hat-trick little more than a minute later, but was unable to hold on to a sleight-of-hand pass from Tulou with his route to the line clear.