sloka

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slo·ka

 (shlō′kə)
n.
A distich of Sanskrit verse consisting of two sixteen-syllable lines of two eight-syllable padas each.

[Sanskrit ślokaḥ, sound, hymn, sloka; see kleu- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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Stories abound of how, after the 1992 Ayodhya demolition, he even pacified Muslim clerics in chaste Urdu and how he often quoted slokas (couplets) from the Bhagavad Gita.
He enthralled the audience with his knowledge on vedas and slokas. He even recited few and explained the meaning to the students.
Another important aspect of ancient Indian learning methods was the usage of 'Slokas' and 'Suktis' in Sanskrit that were recited by Rishis and Gurus as songs and rhymes.
Shaikh Zayed University in Abu Dhabi and its faculty and students are supporting the event in a big way by organising Arabic calligraphy for the yoga icon, designing Sanskrit slokas banner and creating amazing yoga artwork.
Many Ram bhakts went underground with Gita and Ramayan reciting slokas and narrating stories in front of village assemblies as a covert sensitization operation against the national emergency.
Besides sanskrit slokas and keertans, he has done research on folk traditions, both in India and abroad.
Consider, for example, this: The way to celebrate birthdays is not to light candles which is quite a waste considering the cost that goes into making the candles, but by reciting bhajans, slokas and mantras, including the Gayatri Mantra, which cost nothing.
This learned dharmasastrin synthesized in Slokas the teachings of the now ancient dharmasutras with ideas from the teachings of the arthasastra.
On the occasion of Shivratri, devotees observe fasts, recite mantras and slokas of Lord Shiva to stay awake throughout night.
Slokas 11-13 detail the consecration of the eight Digbandhas in the directions of the compass, plus Sadasiva in the centre, Paramasiva in the zenith, and Hara in the nadir.
The team loved the auspicious Indian start to the races with pundit performing the puja with chanting pious slokas from Veda and also seeking blessings of Lord Ganesha for a great race filled with success and safety for all.