slow food

(redirected from Slow Food Movement)
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slow food

n
(Cookery) food that has been prepared with care, using high-quality local and seasonal ingredients
[C20: by analogy with fast food]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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The Slow Food Movement promotes the cause of fresh, ethical food, designed to be savoured and not rushed.
Gareth, one of the few certified Master Chefs working outside London, is due to speak about the slow food movement at the inaugural Welsh Chefs Conference in Cardiff on November 20.
The menu reflects the serious side of the Slow Food movement, highlighting themessageof traditionalfoodsindanger of extinctionbutalsothepassionforfood that the De Giorgis embody.
In addition, the mystery is studded between chapters with mouth-watering ice cream recipes, all of which end with "transfer the complete mixture into an ice cream maker and follow the manufacturer's instructions." Very practical, and also a tongue-in-cheek comment on the dearth of the Slow Food Movement, don't you think?
Finding Lao survival food presented as exotic offerings in trendy American restaurants and traditional Japanese fast-foods in 7-Elevens, they reveal the global and corporate connections in the slow food movement, and local and regional variations of the fast food industry.
(Saturday, noon) - The Slow Food movement is not only about encouraging 'real' food from local artisan producers, but about protecting endangered products from globalisation pressures.
The introduction of the Slow Food Movement in '91, and the critical reverence to honest 'salt of the earth' chefs such as Judy Rogers, Jonathan Waxman, Frank Stitt, Alice Waters has created an educated consumer market.
quest: In a region that champions organic farmers' markets, the slow food movement and community-supported agriculture, why lower our standards when it comes to wetting our whistles?
branch of the Slow Food movement intervened, connecting the few remaining harvesters to restaurants, distributors and consumers.
Though surprising, Batali admits it is the new wave of cooking school guys who promote this idea and that in Italy the Slow Food movement is still very strong and totally dedicated to preserving culinary tradition.
A great strength of the Slow Food movement, Petrini believes, is the positive connection it makes between ethics and taste.
The forgotten foods project is run by the Slow Food movement which aims to re-unite consumers with artisan products.