birth weight

(redirected from Small-for-gestational-age)
Also found in: Medical.
Related to Small-for-gestational-age: SGA infant, intrauterine growth retardation, IUGR

birth weight

or birth·weight (bûrth′wāt′)
n.
The weight of an infant at birth.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Timing and cause of perinatal mortality for small-for-gestational-age babies in South Africa: Critical periods and challenges with detection.
There was no significantly increased risk of stillbirth, preterm birth, or small-for-gestational-age birth in the next pregnancy for women who conceived in that 12-month time period, according to results of the study, which was based on birth records for nearly 14,500 women in Finland, Norway, and Australia.
Neonatal hypoglycemia, hyperbilirubinemia, intensive care unit admission, large-for-gestational-age (LGA) and small-for-gestational-age (SGA) newborns were considered as adverse outcomes.
They also had a higher proportion of small-for-gestational-age neonates (14.3 versus 4.2 percent) and low-birth-weight neonates (12.6 versus 4.2 percent).
A smaller pooling of seven comparisons found a 40% reduction in the risk of small-for-gestational-age (SGA) infants (95% confidence interval, 0.40-0.90) but there were no significant effects on low birth weight, birth lengths, or birth head circumference.
Growth in full-term small-for-gestational-age infants: from birth to final height.
Doppler ultralsound of the uterine arteries: the importance of bilateral notching in the prediction of pre-eclampsia, placental abruption or delivery of a small-for-gestational-age baby.
Most neonates were born [less than or equal to] 2.5 kg (65%), while there were similar numbers of small-for-gestational-age and appropriate-for-gestational-age neonates.
Moreover, women who developed severe gestational HTN had higher rates of preterm delivery at less than 37 weeks of gestation (54.2% vs 17.8%; p=0.001) and at less than 35 weeks of gestation (25% vs 8.4%; p=0.0161), and delivery of small-for-gestational-age infants (20.8% vs 6.5%; p=0.024) when compared to women who remained normotensive or those who developed mild gestational HTN.
Two-dimensional sonographic placental measurements in the prediction of small-for-gestational-age infants.

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