smallpox

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small·pox

 (smôl′pŏks′)
n.
An acute, highly infectious, often fatal disease caused by a poxvirus and characterized by high fever and aches with subsequent widespread eruption of pimples that blister, produce pus, and form pockmarks. Smallpox was eradicated worldwide by 1979 as a result of numerous vaccination campaigns and exists only as a laboratory specimen. Also called variola.

[Early Modern English small pockes, small pustules (as opposed to great pockes, the great pox or syphilis), from pockes, pl. of pock; see pock.]

smallpox

(ˈsmɔːlˌpɒks)
n
(Pathology) an acute highly contagious viral disease characterized by high fever, severe prostration, and a pinkish rash changing in form from papules to pustules, which dry up and form scabs that are cast off, leaving pitted depressions. Technical name: variola
[C16: from small + pox. So called to distinguish it from the Great Pox, an archaic name for syphilis]

small•pox

(ˈsmɔlˌpɒks)

n.
an acute, highly contagious, febrile disease, caused by the variola virus and characterized by a pustular eruption that often leaves permanent pits or scars: eradicated worldwide by vaccination programs.
[1510–20]

small·pox

(smôl′pŏks′)
A highly infectious and often fatal disease caused by a virus and characterized by fever, headache, and severe pimples that result in extensive scarring. Smallpox was once a dreaded killer of children and caused the deaths of millions of Native Americans after the arrival of European settlers in the Americas. Following a worldwide vaccination campaign, smallpox was declared eradicated in 1980, although samples have been preserved in laboratories in the US and Russia. See Note at Jenner.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.smallpox - a highly contagious viral disease characterized by fever and weakness and skin eruption with pustules that form scabs that slough off leaving scarssmallpox - a highly contagious viral disease characterized by fever and weakness and skin eruption with pustules that form scabs that slough off leaving scars
pox - a contagious disease characterized by purulent skin eruptions that may leave pock marks
alastrim, Cuban itch, Kaffir pox, milk pox, pseudosmallpox, pseudovariola, variola minor, West Indian smallpox, white pox - a mild form of smallpox caused by a less virulent form of the virus
pock - a pustule in an eruptive disease

smallpox

noun
Related words
adjective variolous
Translations
مَرَض الجدْري
neštovice
kopper
isorokko
himlõ
bólusótt, stórabóla
smittkoppor
çiçek hastalığı

smallpox

[ˈsmɔːlpɒks] N (Med) → viruela f

smallpox

[ˈsmɔːlpɒks] nvariole fsmall-scale [ˌsmɔːlˈskeɪl] adj
[undertaking, business] → peu important(e), de petite envergure
[map, model] → à petite échellesmall screen n
the small screen → le petit écransmall-size [ˈsmɔːlsaɪz] small-sized [ˈsmɔːlsaɪzd] adjpetit(e)small talk npapotage m
to make small talk → papotersmall-time [ˌsmɔːlˈtaɪm] adj [actor, celebrity] → de troisième ordre
a small-time thief → un voleur à la petite semainesmall town n (US)petite ville fsmall-town [ˌsmɔːlˈtaʊn] adjprovincial(e)

smallpox

[ˈsmɔːlˌpɒks] n (Med) → vaiolo

small

(smoːl) adjective
1. little in size, degree, importance etc; not large or great. She was accompanied by a small boy of about six; There's only a small amount of sugar left; She cut the meat up small for the baby.
2. not doing something on a large scale. He's a small businessman.
3. little; not much. You have small reason to be satisfied with yourself.
4. (of the letters of the alphabet) not capital. The teacher showed the children how to write a capital G and a small g.
small ads
advertisements in the personal columns of a newspaper.
small arms
weapons small and light enough to be carried by a man. They found a hoard of rifles and other small arms belonging to the rebels.
small change
coins of small value. a pocketful of small change.
small hours
the hours immediately after midnight. He woke up in the small hours.
ˈsmallpox noun
a type of serious infectious disease in which there is a severe rash of large, pus-filled spots that usually leave scars.
small screen
television, not the cinema. This play is intended for the small screen.
ˈsmall-time adjective
(of a thief etc) not working on a large scale. a small-time crook/thief.
feel/look small
to feel or look foolish or insignificant. He criticized her in front of her colleagues and made her feel very small.

small·pox

n. viruela, enfermedad infecciosa viral que se manifiesta con un cuadro febril agudo y erupción de ampollas y pústulas diseminadas por todo el cuerpo.

smallpox

n viruela
References in classic literature ?
See here," continued he, drawing forth a small bottle and holding it before their eyes, "in this bottle I hold the small-pox, safely corked up; I have but to draw the cork, and let loose the pestilence, to sweep man, woman, and child from the face of the earth.
Your pap's got the small-pox, and you know it precious well.
A confluent small-pox had in all directions flowed over his face, and left it like the complicated ribbed bed of a torrent, when the rushing waters have been dried up.
In 1633, and the year afterwards, the small-pox broke out among the Massachusetts Indians, multitudes of whom died by this terrible disease of the Old World.
It was a blood-red flag, that fluttered in the tainted air, over the door of every dwelling into which the Small-Pox had entered.
No doubt of it, unless he is fortunate enough to catch the small-pox, and even that is difficult, for we never get any impure air here.
In which light their wretchedness appeared now to Fortune herself; for she at length took pity on this miserable couple, and considerably lessened the wretched state of Partridge, by putting a final end to that of his wife, who soon after caught the small-pox, and died.
On the journey the guard is polite and watchful--won't allow anybody to get into your compartment--tells them you are just recovering from the small-pox and do not like to be disturbed.
then ten years of age, went in state, under pretext of returning thanks for his recovery from the small-pox, to Notre Dame.