snowmelt

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snow·melt

 (snō′mĕlt′)
n.
1. The runoff from melting snow.
2. A period or season when such runoff occurs: streams that flood during snowmelt.

snowmelt

(ˈsnəʊˌmɛlt)
n
(Physical Geography) water produced by the melting of snow

snow•melt

(ˈsnoʊˌmɛlt)

n.
1. water from melting snow.
2. the amount of such water.
[1925–30]
Translations
References in classic literature ?
Yet they won admiration from maturer judges than his school-fellows, and were indeed, remarkably clever, though destitute of the native warmth that might have made the snow melt beneath his hand.
One said this thing, one that, but all agreed that they must wait to act until the snow melted.
"When the snow melts they'll sink in the Polish swamps.
The morning of our departure for Thark dawned clear and hot, as do all Martian mornings except for the six weeks when the snow melts at the poles.
And as the snow melted from the bases of the mountains, the arctic forms would seize on the cleared and thawed ground, always ascending higher and higher, as the warmth increased, whilst their brethren were pursuing their northern journey.
There seem to be endless streams running down the mountains into this river, but as none of them are very large, at present, at all events, though they are doubtless terrible in winter and when the snow melts, the horsemen may not have met much obstruction.
(December), when the snow melts on the Cordillera, is over- flowed by the river.
Coupled with a fast thaw following large accumulated snow melt, over 1,000,000,000 acres of farmland were inundated.
Officials believe the flood was a result of the rapid snow melt and the heavy spring rain, which could get worse over time.The late season snow fall in areas where the ground was already moist added to the flooding.
The dead bodies are exposed following the snow melt towards the end of the climbing season, he said.
"This little-visited region in the far northeast of the country offers the kind of startlingly striking scenery that compels you togaze from the window without blinking, for fear of missing a moment of the majesty of the landscape or one of the astounding suspension bridges that cross the surging rivers filled with snow melt," she further writes.