Social Credit


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Social Credit

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (esp in Canada) a right-wing populist political party, movement, or doctrine based on the socioeconomic theories of Major C. H. Douglas; the federal party in Canada was dissolved in 1993
Social Crediter n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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In June this year, the EU expert group also recommended a moratorium on lethal autonomous weapons, as well as a ban on mass surveillance and social credit scoring.
Foreign businesses in China are ill-prepared for the tough sanctions and constant surveillance demanded by a social credit system to be rolled out this year, a European business group warned Wednesday.
The Government had earlier said it would not implement the Mainland's social credit system in Hong Kong.
Hikvision was involved in several questionable projects in China, including the social credit system, the imprisonment of Uighurs in Xinjiang, and facial recognition systems, the city councilors said.
It has become fairly cliche to call China's surveillance state--its artificial intelligence-driven facial recognition, the new "social credit system," its cultural policing and re-education camps for Uyghur minorities--"something right out of George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four!'
It's hard to keep from envisioning a dystopian implementation of a utopian aspiration: surveillance, AI-driven monitoring, "social credit" scores, and worse.
The social credit system, which will eventually give every Chinese citizen a personalised score, aims to incentivise "trustworthy" behaviour through penalties and rewards.
"Think about the 90 million Christians in China who are followers of Jesus who are now facing growing restrictions, having to deal with facial recognition technologies and having a social credit score," Curry says.
This has gone hand-in-hand with a social credit system that monitors--and if necessary penalises --individual citizens, potentially to a very high degree.
Drawing on the example of social credit scores now being experimented with in China, Lawrence Kastriba shows how governments can apply social media technologies to increase social stratification and control the population.
China, for example, is investing heavily in AI technology such as facial recognition to support its "social credit score" system, which involves conducting precise and determinative surveillance of its citizens.