Social Credit

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Social Credit

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (esp in Canada) a right-wing populist political party, movement, or doctrine based on the socioeconomic theories of Major C. H. Douglas; the federal party in Canada was dissolved in 1993
Social Crediter n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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(7) Later in 1937 when Aberhart had met with John Hargrave, a member of the English social credit movement, he was perplexed at the practical problems of implementing monetary reforms, repeatedly asking: "If I issue a dividend, how do I get the money back?" (8)
The Social Credit movement worried about the role of trading banks in the creation of credit and urged a greater role for interest-free central bank credit.
Conjuring with loose associations between the Social Credit movement and Fascism, he cites Read's passing consideration of 'totalitarian' economic organisation in an article for the BBC's Listener Magazine, 'The Intellectual and Liberty' (1934).
Following William Aberhart's charismatic mobilization of the Social Credit movement but erratic and inevitable betrayal of its promise, Ernest C.
For the most part, however, the chapters address provincial issues that have been either shaped by or have shaped the national constitutional landscape: the emergence and legal defence of separate school boards; the regulation of Indian hunting and fishing rights; the "Persons Case" which in 1929 led to the legal recognition of women as persons under the terms of the British North America Act; the creation of Metis settlements which constitute the only secure land base for the Metis in Canada; the constitutional challenges that came from William Aberhart's Social Credit movement; and, of course, the National Energy Policy.
But we should see Douglas's CCF in the same light as Ernest Manning's Social Credit movement. Both governments were paternalistic and racist, and contributed greatly to the misery of mental patients.
Apart from the searchlight Stingel shines on the pervasive Jew-hating among the secondary leadership of the Social Credit movement before 1947, the major strength of her book is to demonstrate the impact of Social Credit on the development of the Canadian Jewish Congress.
A city that had been among the labour movement's most promising areas of electoral strength became, instead, the cradle of a classless urban populism called the Social Credit movement. Any number of studies have documented the unhinging impact of the Great Depression in Alberta politics; one describes the failure of the Alberta CCF as an "accident of history." To extend the metaphor, Bright argues, in so many words, that this was also an accident just waiting to happen, structured by the fragility of working-class consciousness and often yawning gaps between leaders and led.
A very solid piece of electoral analysis, this work effectively disputes the orthodox class-based explanations of political support for the Social Credit movement. The book is clearly presented and carefully structured; it presents a sufficient historical overview and a fair account of others' attempts to interpret this phenomenon.
Gregory also shows himself bolchevikly ignorant of the Social Credit Movement. Which is what one expects of him.
Douglas, founder of the social credit movement. Back in 1940, Maj.
A year later William Aberhart and his Social Credit movement swept the third UFA premier, and the UFA itself, into political oblivion in the provincial election of 1935.