Social Credit

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Social Credit

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (esp in Canada) a right-wing populist political party, movement, or doctrine based on the socioeconomic theories of Major C. H. Douglas; the federal party in Canada was dissolved in 1993
Social Crediter n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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(89) On the other hand, the Canadian Social Crediter, a national paper from Ontario representing the movement, reflected the views of Byrne and Douglas--publishing lists of prominent Jewish financiers and explanations of Douglas's conspiracy theories.
Byrne was fired in February 1948 and the editor of the Canadian Social Crediter was also fired.
In her article "Should He Who Pays the Piper Call the Tune?" in The Social Crediter for economic democracy, former academic Margaret Atkins wonders if the "paymaster" (i.e., both legislators and students) is "the right person to decide the way in which the piper should account for how and what he plays?" (7)
(2) Other pieces on Keegstra followed, but these two works explored the connection between the Social Credit movement's anti-Semitic ideology and the beliefs and actions of James Keegstra, a Social Crediter and Alberta high school teacher convicted in 1985 of wilfully promoting hatred against Jews.
Douglas's conspiracy theories were also disseminated by the party's propaganda organ, Today and Tomorrow (later renamed the Canadian Social Crediter) and its French-language counterpart, Vers Demain.
She ran in the North Battleford riding for the United Progressives (a coalition of Co-operative Commonwealth Federation supporters, social crediters and communists).
While she corroborates earlier authors' view that the party was obsessed with conspiratorial thinking regarding the behaviour of financiers and, by the 1940s, with supposed links between the financiers and international socialism, Communism, and trade unionism, she emphasizes that such loony ideas were held together by the Social Crediters' views that the Jews were the glue that held together this conspiratorial coalition of publicly antagonistic groups.
In reality, however, the Social Crediters had no evidence of a "conspiracy" of financiers against "the people." The moderates may have been less racist but they were, like Douglas, the victims of paranoid delusions.
The strength of Hesketh's work is his focus on what leading Social Crediters believed they were doing throughout their history, first as a social movement, then as a government.
Hence my contention that Social Crediters did not see regional exploitation, including the type alluded to by Fierlbeck, as the crux of the problem.