carbon tax

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carbon tax

n
(Environmental Science) a tax on the emissions caused by the burning of coal, gas, and oil, aimed at reducing the production of greenhouse gases
References in periodicals archive ?
Using a lower estimate for the social cost of carbon could allow the administration to undermine a range of environmental regulations by exaggerating the compliance costs compared to the societal benefits of reduced carbon emissions.
The discussion will focus on the key economic and financial issues related to the impact of climate change, including systemic financial stability risks from climate change, regulatory perspectives on green financing with industry perspectives, and measuring the social cost of carbon.
In an optimized climate policy, abstracting away from distortions, the social cost of carbon will equal the carbon price or the carbon tax.
Moreover, we don't know how many of those 40% would be willing to pay to prevent harm, with economic surveys suggesting that most US residents aren't willing to pay the full social cost of carbon.
Wolverton, 2013: Developing a social cost of carbon for US regulatory analysis: A methodology and interpretation.
amp;nbsp;Review of Estimates of the Social Cost of Carbon, Nitrous Oxide, and Methane for Regulatory Impact Analysis.
A US federal court last week upheld the approach that the government uses to calculate the social cost of carbon when it issues regulations -- and not just the cost imposed on Americans, but on people worldwide.
Yale has based its social cost of carbon on the federal government's estimate of $40 per ton of carbon dioxide.
One of the most rewarding projects I worked on in my time at the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) prior to entering the legal academy was an interagency effort to quantify the social cost of carbon for use in CBA of rules affecting greenhouse- gas emissions.
This partnership focuses on providing a strong intellectual justification for the use of the social cost of carbon in regulatory proceedings.
The Uncomfortable Relationship Between A-4 and the Social Cost of Carbon
A caveat to this prescription is that the rate may need to differ from the social cost of carbon in the presence of market distortions.