mores

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mores

(pronounced moray) customs, conventions, practices: The settlers brought the mores of the old country with them.
Not to be confused with:
morays – tropical eels having porelike gill openings and no pectoral fins: moray eel

mo·res

 (môr′āz′, -ēz)
pl.n.
1. The accepted traditional customs and usages of a particular social group.
2. Moral attitudes.
3. Manners; ways.

[Latin mōrēs, pl. of mōs, custom; see mē- in Indo-European roots.]
Usage Note: Although educated 19th-century speakers of English would pronounce mores as (môr′ēz) according to the customary pronunciation of Latin in English-speaking countries at that time, 75 percent of the Usage Panel in 2005 found this same pronunciation unacceptable (although 5 percent actually preferred it). Nowadays, the accepted pronunciation is (môr′āz), with a long a as in days and a (z) sound at the end. It is incorrect to pronounce it as a single syllable (môrz), and the pronunciation ending with an (s) sound, which more closely resembles the way the Latin word was actually pronounced by the Romans, may sound pretentious.

mores

(ˈmɔːreɪz)
pl n
(Sociology) sociol the customs and conventions embodying the fundamental values of a group or society
[C20: from Latin, plural of mōs custom]

mo•res

(ˈmɔr eɪz, -iz, ˈmoʊr-)

n.pl.
folkways of central importance accepted without question and embodying the fundamental moral views of a social group.
[1905–10; < Latin mōres, pl. of mōs usage, custom]

mores

, anomie - Mores is the Latin plural of mor/mos and means "acquired customs and manners"; social and moral conventions are mores, and the lack of these is anomie.
See also related terms for social.

mores

The common ideas, conventions, or customs of a particular society or social group.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mores - (sociology) the conventions that embody the fundamental values of a group
normal, convention, rule, pattern, formula - something regarded as a normative example; "the convention of not naming the main character"; "violence is the rule not the exception"; "his formula for impressing visitors"
sociology - the study and classification of human societies

mores

plural noun customs, ways, practices, traditions, way of life, conventions the accepted mores of British society

mores

noun
Socially correct behavior:
decorum, etiquette, good form, manner (used in plural), propriety (also used in plural), p's and q's.
Translations

mores

[ˈmɔːreɪz] NPLcostumbres fpl

mores

plSittenkodex m

mores

[ˈmɔːreɪz] npl (frm) → costumi mpl
References in periodicals archive ?
We are all implicated in social mores that devalue women and girls.
The novel explores the lives of three sisters as they witness Oman slowly redefining itself from a traditional society to its complex present state, where social mores parley with aspiration, technology, and oil money.sa
Moreover, literature and social mores not only inform each other but may be fairly understood as continuous.
Kibaki said Kamaru's commentary on social mores and cultural ethos defines a legacy that is hard to match.
She resists and resents piano and embroidery lessons designed to make her a better wife and has no interest in romance, beyond chronicling the social mores of her times in stories.
She explores how popular culture operated at the intersection of consumer capitalism, tourism, the regulatory state, and sexual and social mores, and the roles of musicians, club owners, audiences, and authorities.
In humans, social mores also provide a nudge toward healthier habits, like washing your hands and not eating out of the garbage.
The sleazy streets of 1970s New York City have become a cinematic cliche at this point, standing in for so many shifts in social mores, sex, and the cityscape.
They spotlight a struggle that more often than not is fought by youth who opt for individual ways of carving out spaces in which they can circumvent restrictive social mores rather than organizing politically.
Neang Sovathana, who rose to fame as the radio host 'DJ Nana', answering risque questions on love and sexuality, said the generational friction over sexuality was a product of youth testing how far beyond the old restrictive social mores they can push.
A SERIES eye-catching roadside billboards in north east Wales are celebrating the changing social mores of post-war agriculture.
As a result, Clark's characters become "adulterous" to the status quo, that is, they stop adhering to standard social mores or senses of duty.