cultural anthropology

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cultural anthropology

n.
The scientific study of the development of human cultures based on ethnographic, linguistic, social, and psychological data and methods of analysis.

cultural anthropology

n
(Anthropology & Ethnology) the branch of anthropology dealing with cultural as opposed to biological and racial features
cultural anthropologist n

cul′tural anthropol′ogy


n.
the branch of anthropology dealing with the origins, history, and development of human culture, esp. its social forms and institutions. Compare physical anthropology.
[1920–25]
cul′tural anthropol′ogist, n.

cultural anthropology

a specialty that studies the creative achievements of societies, especially those passed on through later generations. Also called culturology.
See also: Anthropology
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cultural anthropology - the branch of anthropology that deals with human culture and society
anthropology - the social science that studies the origins and social relationships of human beings
garbology - the study of a society by analyzing its garbage
mythology - the study of myths
ritualism - the study of religious or magical rites and ceremonies
References in periodicals archive ?
Contributors in sociocultural anthropology, social sciences, digital cultures, social media, media studies, communication cultural studies, and digital ethnography offer interdisciplinary case studies from around the world.
Prof Mahmood specialised in sociocultural anthropology and was a scholar of modern Egypt.
The field encompasses methodological and theoretical aspects of biological anthropology as well as archaeology and sociocultural anthropology. Many of the current methods used in forensic anthropology stem not only from the anthropological sciences, but also from chemistry, engineering, biomechanics, biology, and other natural and social sciences.
Consistently privileged in sociocultural anthropology, ethnographic methods are being increasingly turned to by other disciplines: They have experienced a resurgence in sociology and an expansion in other fields including geography, science and technology studies, gender studies, and public health, as well as criminology and law and society.
Nevertheless, physical anthropology has not experienced the kind of disciplinary decolonization that has, in the last few decades, influenced the practices of sociocultural anthropology and, to a lesser extent, archaeology in the United States.
Objective: INNO-ACT brings sociocultural anthropology and innovation studies together to tackle the following interrelated questions: (i) How did innovation arise to its current prominence, particularly in the European Union?
The 25 papers in the 2013 edition of the annual series survey the findings of recent research on archaeology, biological anthropology, linguistics and communicative practices, regional studies, and sociocultural anthropology. Several reviews interweave the theme of evidence by addressing the tension between the evidential regimes of legal and scientific practices in the United States, the technological challenges of analyzing ancient biomolecules, and the ontology of scientific facts in anthropological genetics.