sociology

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so·ci·ol·o·gy

 (sō′sē-ŏl′ə-jē, -shē-)
n.
1. The study of human social behavior, especially the study of the origins, organization, institutions, and development of human society.
2. Analysis of a social institution or societal segment as a self-contained entity or in relation to society as a whole.

[French sociologie : socio-, socio- + -logie, study (from Greek -logiā; see -logy).]

so′ci·o·log′ic (-ə-lŏj′ĭk), so′ci·o·log′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
so′ci·o·log′i·cal·ly adv.
so′ci·ol′o·gist n.

sociology

(ˌsəʊsɪˈɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Sociology) the study of the development, organization, functioning, and classification of human societies
sociological adj
ˌsocioˈlogically adv
ˌsociˈologist n

so•ci•ol•o•gy

(ˌsoʊ siˈɒl ə dʒi, ˌsoʊ ʃi-)

n.
the science or study of the origin, development, organization, and functioning of human society; science of the fundamental laws of social relations, institutions, etc.
[1835–45; < French sociologie, coined by A. Comte in 1830; see socio-, -logy]
so`ci•ol′o•gist, n.

so·ci·ol·o·gy

(sō′sē-ŏl′ə-jē)
The scientific study of human social behavior and its origins, development, organizations, and institutions.

sociology

1. the science or study of the origin, development, organization, and functioning of human society.
2. the science of fundamental laws of social behavior, relations, institutions, etc. — sociologist, n. — sociological, adj.
See also: Mankind
1. the science or study of the origin, development, organization, and functioning of human society.
2. the science of the fundamental laws of social relations, institutions, etc. — sociologist, n. — sociologie, sociological, adj.
See also: Society

sociology

The scientific study of human societies, including their functioning, origins, and development.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sociology - the study and classification of human societiessociology - the study and classification of human societies
mores - (sociology) the conventions that embody the fundamental values of a group
social science - the branch of science that studies society and the relationships of individual within a society
criminology - the scientific study of crime and criminal behavior and law enforcement
demography, human ecology - the branch of sociology that studies the characteristics of human populations
psephology - the branch of sociology that studies election trends (as by opinion polls)
sociometry - the quantitative study of social relationships
structural sociology, structuralism - a sociological theory based on the premise that society comes before individuals
Translations
sociologie
sociologi
sosiologia
sociologija
社会学
사회학
sociologi
สังคมวิทยา
xã hội học

sociology

[ˌsəʊsɪˈɒlədʒɪ] Nsociología f

sociology

[ˌsəʊsiˈɒlədʒi] nsociologie f

sociology

nSoziologie f

sociology

[ˌsəʊsɪˈɒlədʒɪ] nsociologia

sociology

عِلْمُ الْاجْتِمَاعِ sociologie sociologi Soziologie κοινωνιολογία sociología sosiologia sociologie sociologija sociologia 社会学 사회학 sociologie sosiologi socjologia sociologia социология sociologi สังคมวิทยา toplumbilim xã hội học 社会学

sociology

n. sociología, ciencia que trata de las relaciones sociales y de los fenómenos de tipo social.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lynd; the tradition of social criticism of Thorstein Veblen and others as a type of sociological inquiry that is relevant, substantive, and public; the philosophy of pragmatism and the work of Dewey; connections between Dewey and Mills; and questions about how social science can play a role in the resolution of societal problems and the role of values in this, including the views of Hilary Putnam, Gunnar Myrdal, Max Weber, Mills, and Dewey.
Therefore, to grasp the full range of our relations and our entanglement with the world, we need to incorporate various nonhuman or not-only-human things and materials into sociological inquiry.
Seeking the American Dream: A Sociological Inquiry by Robert C.
It makes a case for a radical Black subject-position that structures and is structured by an intramural social order that revels in the underside of the stereotype and ultimately destabilizes the very notion of "civil society" and is positioned as memoir, sociological inquiry, literary analysis, and cultural critique that explores topics as varied as serial murder, reality television, Christian evangelism, teenage pregnancy, and the work of Toni Morrison to advance Black feminist practice as a mode through which Black sociality is both theorized and made material.
In the introductory course "Sociological Inquiry," which Coleman co-taught, I saw that his approach to teaching sociology was unique.
However, the book's contribution to broader sociological inquiry would be strengthened by discussing more of these key issues explicitly in the text.
I, behavioral and sociological inquiry are the subjects of chapters eight through ten, (8) Sex and Love, (9) Drugs, Dance and Music and 10,The Amazon Way.
This article introduces institutional ethnography as a valuable approach to sociological inquiry for health and nursing research in New Zealand.
Arguably his most brilliant and eminently readable book, The Sociological Imagination, struck decisive blows against the empiricist, pseudo-scientistic character of sociological inquiry in the United States, excoriating the reigning orthodoxy of Talbot Parsons' structural functionalism and deploring the sterile fetishization of method that had come to dominate the social sciences.
The text leads students to interrogate classic questions of sociological inquiry in their digital manifestations: structure versus agency, conflict versus consensus, the relationship between action and meaning, and the interface between the individual and collective experience.
Papers intersect on traditional areas of sociological inquiry, such as social wellbeing, migration, gender and care work, but make use of a variety of methodologies to showcase a range of contemporary approaches to researching emotions in social science.
The fastidiousness of this sociological inquiry is undeniably impressive, even if it sometimes puts a stranglehold on spontaneity, as in the emergence of a dark third-act twist.