Socratic method

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Socratic method

n.
A pedagogical technique in which a teacher does not give information directly but instead asks a series of questions, with the result that the student comes either to the desired knowledge by answering the questions or to a deeper awareness of the limits of knowledge.

Socratic method

n
(Philosophy) philosophy the method of instruction by question and answer used by Socrates in order to elicit from his pupils truths he considered to be implicitly known by all rational beings. Compare maieutic

Socrat′ic meth′od


n.
the use of questions, as employed by Socrates, to develop a latent idea in the mind of a student or elicit an admission from an opponent.
[1735–45]

Socratic method

- A teaching technique in which a teacher does not give information directly but instead asks a series of questions, with the result that the student comes either to the desired knowledge by answering the questions or to a deeper awareness of the limits of knowledge.
See also related terms for teacher.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Socratic method - a method of teaching by question and answerSocratic method - a method of teaching by question and answer; used by Socrates to elicit truths from his students
pedagogics, pedagogy, teaching method - the principles and methods of instruction
References in periodicals archive ?
For her, thinking was an inner Socratic debate in which one questions oneself constantly, challenging one's own fixed ideas, considering and re-considering everything that presents itself to the mind, the "soundless dialogue of the I with itself.
I don't lionise our 2010 General Election as a Socratic debate in the public interest.
Afua Cooper in her book "The Hanging of Angelique" (2006) addresses the English population and engages us in a Socratic debate to show that, contrary to Trudel and other writers on the matter, that Angelique set the fire for revenge, not for love.