sell off

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Related to Sold Off: spin off, sell off

sell

 (sĕl)
v. sold (sōld), sell·ing, sells
v.tr.
1. To exchange or deliver for money or its equivalent: We sold our old car for a modest sum.
2. To offer or have available for sale: The store sells health foods.
3. To give up or surrender in exchange for a price or reward: sell one's soul to the devil.
4. To be purchased in (a certain quantity); achieve sales of: a book that sold a million copies.
5.
a. To bring about or encourage sales of; promote: Good publicity sold the product.
b. To cause to be accepted; advocate successfully: We sold the proposal to the school committee.
6. To persuade (another) to recognize the worth or desirability of something: They sold me on the idea.
v.intr.
1. To exchange ownership for money or its equivalent; engage in selling: Are any of the fruit vendors still selling?
2. To be sold or be on sale: Grapes are selling high this season.
3. To attract prospective buyers; be popular on the market: an item that doesn't sell.
4. To be approved of; gain acceptance: an idea that just wouldn't sell.
n.
1. An act or instance of selling: ordered a sell of his shares in the company.
2. Something that sells or gains acceptance in a particular way: Their program to raise taxes will be a difficult sell.
3. Slang A deception; a hoax.
Phrasal Verbs:
sell off
To get rid of by selling, often at reduced prices.
sell out
1. To sell all of a supply of something: We have sold out of that model.
2. To cause (someone) to have sold an entire supply of something: The bakery is sold out of those pastries.
3. To be entirely sold: Her new novel has sold out.
4. Slang To betray one's principles or colleagues: He sold out to the other side.
sell through
To be purchased as a retail item by a customer: The clothes are in the store, but they aren't selling through.
Idioms:
sell a bill of goods Informal
To take unfair advantage of.
sell down the river Informal
To betray the trust or faith of.
sell short
1. To contract for the sale of securities or commodities one expects to own at a later date and at more advantageous terms.
2. To underestimate the true value or worth of: Don't sell your colleague short; she's a smart lawyer.

[Middle English sellen, from Old English sellan, to give, sell.]

sell′a·ble adj.

sell off

vb
(Commerce) (tr, adverb) to sell (remaining or unprofitable items), esp at low prices
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.sell off - get rid of by selling, usually at reduced prices; "The store sold off the surplus merchandise"
sell - exchange or deliver for money or its equivalent; "He sold his house in January"; "She sells her body to survive and support her drug habit"

sell

verb
1. To offer for sale:
2. To succeed in causing (a person) to act in a certain way.Also used with on:
phrasal verb
sell for
1. To achieve (a certain price):
2. To require a specified price:
phrasal verb
sell off
To get rid of completely by selling, especially in quantity or at a discount:
phrasal verb
sell out
1. To get rid of completely by selling, especially in quantity or at a discount:
2. Slang. To be treacherous to:
Slang: rat (on).
Idiom: sell down the river .
noun
Translations
يَبْيعُيَبيعُ بِسُرْعَةٍ وأسْعار مُنْخَفِضَه
rozprodatvyprodat
realiseresælge ud
myydä
rasprodati
selja ódÿrt; losa sig viî
売り払う
싸게 팔아치우다
sälja av
ขายในราคาถูก
bán hạ giá

w>sell off

vt sepverkaufen; (= get rid of quickly, cheaply)abstoßen; (at auction) → versteigern

sell

(sel) past tense, past participle sold (sould) verb
1. to give something in exchange for money. He sold her a car; I've got some books to sell.
2. to have for sale. The farmer sells milk and eggs.
3. to be sold. His book sold well.
4. to cause to be sold. Packaging sells a product.
ˌsell-out noun
1. an event, especially a concert, for which all the tickets are sold. His concert was a sell-out.
2. a betrayal. The gang realized it was a sell-out and tried to escape.
be sold on
to be enthusiastic about. I'm sold on the idea of a holiday in Canada.
be sold out
1. to be no longer available. The second-hand records are all sold out; The concert is sold out.
2. to have no more available to be bought. We are sold out of children's socks.
sell down the river
to betray. The gang was sold down the river by one of its associates.
sell off
to sell quickly and cheaply. They're selling off their old stock.
sell out
1. (sometimes with of) to sell all of something. We sold out our entire stock.
2. to be all sold. The second-hand records sold out within minutes of the sale starting.
sell up
to sell a house, business etc. He has sold up his share of the business.

sell off

يَبْيعُ rozprodat sælge ud verkaufen εκποιώ liquidar myydä solder rasprodati liquidare 売り払う 싸게 팔아치우다 uitverkopen selge ut wyprzedać liquidar распродавать sälja av ขายในราคาถูก elden çıkarmak bán hạ giá 廉价出售
References in classic literature ?
Why, sold off in a jiffy, and no character, and I might find myself slaved about under a butcher's boy, or worked to death at some seaside place where no one cared for me, except to find out how fast I could go, or be flogged along in some cart with three or four great men in it going out for a Sunday spree, as I have often seen in the place I lived in before I came here; no," said he, shaking his head, "I hope I shall never come to that.
When I had more control I did what I could: sold off the two and a half animals, and the mangy pony, and the superannuated tools; pulled down the outhouses; drained; thinned out I don't know how many guelder-roses and elder-trees; and inside the house I turned the old kitchen into a hall, and made a kitchen behind where the dairy was.
Peter sold off everything, and left the country--went to be cook in a railway construction camp where gangs of Russians were employed.
On the sideboard, between fluted Sheraton knife-cases, stood a decanter of Haut Brion, and another of the old Lanning port (the gift of a client), which the wastrel Tom Lanning had sold off a year or two before his mysterious and discreditable death in San Francisco--an incident less publicly humiliating to the family than the sale of the cellar.
He sold off everything almost directly, and bought a stock of Egyptian curiosities, which he intended selling at Damascus; but as the caravan with which he would have to travel would not be starting for another six weeks, he took advantage of the delay to visit the Pyramids, and some of the cities along the banks of the Nile.
Brownlow had sold off his goods, and gone to the West Indies, six weeks before.
For a little relief I had put off my house and took lodgings; and as I was reducing my living, so I sold off most of my goods, which put a little money in my pocket, and I lived near a year upon that, spending very sparingly, and eking things out to the utmost; but still when I looked before me, my very heart would sink within me at the inevitable approach of misery and want.
Pitt had only once made his appearance in London, when he stopped for a few days at the house, did business with his lawyers there, and sold off all Miss Crawley's French novels to a bookseller out of Bond Street.
In the meantime, I put myself on a short allowance of bear's grease, wholly abandoned scented soap and lavender water, and sold off three waistcoats at a prodigious sacrifice, as being too luxurious for my stern career.
France-based insurance provider, AXA SA (CS:FP), said that it has sold off its brokerage.
Saudi Arabia has sold off significant volumes of European stocks in the midst of its invasion into Yemen and sliding oil prices, a study released by JP Morgan revealed, RIA Novosti reported.
THOUSANDS of council homes in the North East could be sold off privately, leading to growing fears of a housing crisis, it has been claimed.