solon

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So·lon

 (sō′lən, -lŏn′) 638?-559? bc.
Athenian lawgiver and poet. His reforms preserved a class system based on wealth but ended privilege by birth.

so·lon

 (sō′lən, -lŏn′)
n.
1. A wise lawgiver.
2. A legislator.

[After Solon.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Solon

(ˈsəʊlən)
n
(Biography) ?638–?559 bc, Athenian statesman, who introduced economic, political, and legal reforms
Solonian, Solonic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

So•lon

(ˈsoʊ lən)

n.
1. c638–c558 B.C., Athenian statesman.
2. (often l.c.) a wise lawgiver.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Solon - a man who is a respected leader in national or international affairssolon - a man who is a respected leader in national or international affairs
elder statesman - an elderly statesman whose advice is sought be government leaders
Founding Father - a member of the Constitutional Convention that drafted the United States Constitution in 1787
pol, political leader, politico, politician - a person active in party politics
stateswoman - a woman statesman
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
He made a place for an admirable type, "the man of public spirit": "When he cannot establish the right, he will not disdain to ameliorate the wrong; but like Solon, when he cannot establish the best system of laws, he will endeavour to establish the best that the people can bear." Showing Solonic virtue, Cooke's book combines policy wisdom and responsible concerns for political effectiveness.
Although Aristotle uncritically accepts many aspects of the Solonic state, he correctly points out the democratic character of Solon's coin debasement, which artificially equalized unequal amounts of silver.
For the importance of the Athenian funerary oration, see Loraux 1986; Seaford 74-86 on Solonic legislation, 84 on gender, 92-105 on reciprocal violence and Athens, 132 on Eumenides, 139-43 on lamentation and tragedy.