Solyman


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Solyman

(ˈsɒlɪmən)
n
(Biography) a variant spelling of Suleiman I
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Livia is infamed, for the poisoning of her husband; Roxalana, Solyman's wife, was the destruction of that renowned prince, Sultan Mustapha, and otherwise troubled his house and succession; Edward the Second of England, his queen, had the principal hand in the deposing and murder of her husband.
The destruction of Mustapha (that we named before) was so fatal to Solyman's line, as the succession of the Turks, from Solyman until this day, is suspected to be untrue, and of strange blood; for that Selymus the Second, was thought to be suppositious.
"Thou art wiser, O King, than Solyman the Great, and thy servant is as dust in the tomb of thy dog, yet thou errest.
Having heard only four reports from the muskets, I was led to believe that they were worked by the islanders in the same manner as the Sultan Solyman's ponderous artillery at the siege of Byzantium, one of them taking an hour or two to load and train.
Tyrannical figures abounded, from Marlowe's Tamburlaine (1587-88) to Shakespeare's Richard III (1589-1592) and Macbeth (1605-1606), and some of them deployed more prominent "Greek features" than others: Cambises in Thomas Preston's homonymous play, which was performed before Elizabeth during the Christmas revels of 1560-1561; Mordred in Thomas Hughes's The Misfortunes of Arthur, which was presented during Gray's Inn entertainment offered to the queen in 1588; Solyman in Fulke Greville's Mustapha, a closet drama published posthumously in 1633, but, like Alaham, written in the 1590s.
Solyman Najimi, CEO of Vitila Brands LLC, explains his inspiration for TOGA[TM]: "So many people I know love their EOS[R] lip balms, including my own family.
In Mustapha, the human face (as reflective, or not, of the human mind) is a 'glass': early in the play, the scheming Rossa tries to persuade Solyman of his son Mustapha's duplicity, to hasten the filicide: 'This is the glasse which Father looks not in; | The Workman hides, the instruments discouer.' (41) She misrepresents the open, exemplary Mustapha here as an artificer--'The Workman'--while she and her confederates are the 'instruments'--the scientific searchers-out of truth.
The McKellops collection holds both the London and Philadelphia imprints of The Tooth-Ache, a rather charming comic that was written by Horace Mayhew and illustrated by George Cruikshank, two giants of nineteenth century British satire; and the dental poetry of Solyman Brown is also present.
Such as following: the Treatise "al-Eshgh and al-Nesa" by Jahiz (died in the year 250 AH), the book "al-Zahreh" by Abu Bakr Mohammad Ibn Dawud (died in the year 297 AH), the book "Eatedal al-gholoob" by Abu Bakr Mohammad Ibn Jafar al-sameri al-khareti (died in the year 327 AH), the book "Masre al-Oshagh" by Abu Mohammad Jafar Ibn Ahmad al-Seraj al-Ghari (died in the year 50 AH), the book "Rowzeh al-Ashegh va Nozhat al-Vamegh" by Ahmad Ibn Solyman Ibn Mohammad Alkasai Alshafi (died in the seven century AH) and so on.
1587), Lorenzo claims: "lie trust my selfe, my selfe shalbe my freend." (18) In Kyd's less popular Solyman and Perseda (c.
Israeli F16 plane launched dozens of airstrikes targeting an area east of al-Tofaha neighborhood as well as shelled two houses belonging Solyman Hamada, leveling it to the ground.