sorosis


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sorosis

(səˈrəʊsɪs)
n, pl -ses (-siːz)
(Plants) a fleshy multiple fruit, such as that of the pineapple and mulberry, formed from flowers that are crowded together on a fleshy stem
[C19: from New Latin, from Greek sōros a heap]

sorosis

a woman’s club or society, named after a club of that name, founded in 1869.
See also: Society

Sorosis

 a women’s club or society, 1868.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The flowers develop into individual fruitlets that coalesce into a sorosis type infrutescence (OKIMOTO, 1948).
Louise was a member of the Sorosis Chapter 329 Order of the Eastern Star in Grayslake serving as Past Matron.
Mulberry sorosis, Popcorn disease, Patho-stress, Comparative proteomics, Mass spectrometry analysis.
Sorosis best known for a successful bet against the pound in 1992 that contributed to forcing Britain to withdraw from the European Exchange Rate Mechanism, a predecessor of the euro.
Also in 1868, New York journalist Jane Cunningham Croly organized Sorosis, a professional women's association.
Unicamente Capparis (Capparaceae), Cordia (Boraginaceae), Lonchocarpus (Fabaceae), Diospyros (Ebenaceae), Ocotea (Lauraceae), Pouteria (Sapotaceae), Robinsonella (Malvaceae), Senna (Caesalpiniaceae), Talisia (Sapindaceae) y Urera (Urticaceae) presentaron dos tipos de fruto y el resto de los miembros de esta categoria supraespecifica tuvieron solo uno (Apendice), a pesar de que ocho se ubican entre los que tienen mas de 10 especies: Miconia (25 especies, bayas), Eugenia (23, bayas), Inga (20, camaras), Piper (18, sorosis), Psychotria (18, drupas), Ficus (17, siconos), Nectandra (15, bayas), Croton (12, cocarios), Ardisia (13, drupas), Calypthranthes (12, bayas) y Solanum (10, bayas).
Its composition of mostly middle-class, white women reflected the legacy of its nineteenth-century predecessors, who proudly traced their club lineage to an association of elite women writers called Sorosis, founded in New York City in 1868.
(10) Post-Civil War women's clubs like New York's Sorosis, founded in 1868, likewise offered spaces for mutual study and discussion (Stanton et al., 1886, pp.
(16) The paper leased office space in the Woman's Bureau in New York, run by Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, but it was considered so radical that other women's groups, including Sorosis, a society for professional women, refused to rent space at the Bureau because they did not want to be near the Revolution (I.
The Sorosis Women's Club, one of the earliest white women's clubs, is founded in New York in response to the exclusion of women from the New York Press Club (Giddings, 1985: 97).