sound shift

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sound shift

n
(Phonetics & Phonology) a gradual alteration or series of alterations in the pronunciation of a set of sounds, esp of vowels. See also Great Vowel Shift
References in periodicals archive ?
Julie Graham and Brian Cox delivered sound shifts with generic procedural material, the latter positioned as the obvious red herring by the time the "Next time" teaser appeared.
However, by using the laws for sound shifts, reconstruction is possible.
Their sound shifts you back to the late 60s early 70s sound the likes of the Donovan and Electric Prunes.
This sound shifts with the variations in the playback of each of the unsynced color loops and shares acoustic space with the whir of the film projectors, creating a pas de deux of machine- and information-age sonic materials, themselves set in tandem with the flickering pastel palette of Sharits's image tracks.
By donning headphones that come with the instrument, a technician can listen to sound shifts rather than having to view them on the meter.
In relation to English use in New Zealand, Woods (1997) observes that sound shifts, and specifically the shift in the front short vowels, show different patterns of change within different social groups of speakers.
The remainder of this paper is concerned with precisely this question, and specifically how internal and external forces have intersected in a sound shift that has occurred in the English of New Zealand.
Solid bodies change little when subjected to subtitles, sound shifts, snow drifts--I mean, a ballerina is not just a metaphor.
Swain then gives a brief overview of the evolution of languages in chapter 7 and discusses general parallels between sound shifts in music and speech.