South Arabian

(redirected from South Arabian languages)

South Arabian

adj
1. (Placename) of or relating to the former South Arabia (now South Yemen) or its inhabitants
2. (Peoples) of or relating to the former South Arabia (now South Yemen) or its inhabitants
n
(Peoples) a native or inhabitant of South Arabia
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
According to Dr Al Jahdhami, these languages belong to three groups: Kamzari, Lawati, and Balochi belong to the Indo-Iranian language's family, while Harsusi, Bathari, Hobyot, Mehri, and Jabbali belong to the modern South Arabian languages. Swahili is a Bantu language and it belongs to the Niger-Congo language group.
The discussions focused on a wide range of topics such as "The Modern South Arabian languages", "Poetry, figurative language and nature in Modern South Arabian poetry", "Is the Qatari dialect an endangered language?", "Kumzari and the languages of Musandam", "Flora of Southern and Eastern Arabia", and more.
Discussions focused on a wide range of topics such as 'The Modern South Arabian languages', 'Poetry, figurative language and nature in Modern South Arabian poetry', 'Is the Qatari dialect an endangered language?', 'Kumzari and the languages of Musandam', 'Flora of Southern and Eastern Arabia', and more.
135-44) stands out for its innovative use of fieldwork and technology to address a thorny historical problem, namely the historical articulation of two phonemes in Proto-Semitic and its daughter languages, such as Arabic and the Modern South Arabian languages.
'Contrasting Articulations in the Modern South Arabian Languages', in James and T.
JEDDAH: IBRAHIM NAFEEIt would be difficult to save several endangered south Arabian languages, including one spoken only by a small community in the far southeast of Saudi Arabia, a renowned linguist said Wednesday.
She offers a descriptive account of two dialects of Mehri, with reference to Yemeni Mehri and four of the other five Modern South Arabian languages (acronym: MSAL).
11, 31, 62), an idea that goes back to his 1989 article in which he shows that there are a number of features that potentially can be interpreted as displaying not only "Yemeni" but also features of South Arabian languages. Without gainsaying the potential correctness of these observations, there are two points to be made about such an observation, and about including the term "comparative" in the book's title.
A specialist in Semitic languages, Rubin (Pennsylvania State U.) offers a grammar of one of the six traditionally unwritten languages known collectively as the Modern South Arabian languages, which are in turn part of the Semitic language family.
The Modern South Arabian Languages. In Semitic Languages, ed.
That said, the chapter is a nice overview of the Epigraphic South Arabian languages. In section 1.1.2, the authors say of the variant Hadramitic 3fs pronominal suffixes -[s.sub.3]/-t, "we deal with a purely phonetic shift i to [s.sub.3]." This statement would suggest that the original 3fs suffix was -t.

Full browser ?