Southern Rhodesia


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Related to Southern Rhodesia: Northern Rhodesia, Japanese Islands

Southern Rhodesia

American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Southern Rhodesia

n
(Placename) the former name (until 1964) of Zimbabwe
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Zim•bab•we

(zɪmˈbɑb weɪ, -wi)

n.
1. Formerly, (until 1964) Southern Rhodesia, (1964–80) Rhodesia. a republic in S Africa: a former British colony; unilaterally declared independence in 1965; gained independence in 1980. 11,423,175; 150,873 sq. mi. (390,759 sq. km).Cap.: Harare.
Zim•bab′we•an, adj., n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Southern Rhodesia - a landlocked republic in south central Africa formerly called RhodesiaSouthern Rhodesia - a landlocked republic in south central Africa formerly called Rhodesia; achieved independence from the United Kingdom in 1980
capital of Zimbabwe, Harare, Salisbury - the capital and largest city of Zimbabwe
Bulawayo - industrial city in southwestern Zimbabwe
Africa - the second largest continent; located to the south of Europe and bordered to the west by the South Atlantic and to the east by the Indian Ocean
Victoria Falls, Victoria - a waterfall in the Zambezi River on the border between Zimbabwe and Zambia; diminishes seasonally
Zambezi, Zambezi River - an African river; flows into the Indian Ocean
Cewa, Chewa, Chichewa - a member of the Bantu-speaking people of Malawi and eastern Zambia and northern Zimbabwe
Zimbabwean - a native or inhabitant of Zimbabwe
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
As a result, by 1930, organizations like the Southern Rhodesia Native Association (SRNA) became a major voice for articulating the concerns of the urbanized Africans and managed to carve out a niche for themselves, especially among the educated urban Africans, or those deemed "the better class of native." (98) The SRNA had also managed to gain acceptance as a representative organization of urban Africans that was tolerated by the government and council, the only source of conflict being its attempt to extend its tentacles into the Reserves.
They resettled in Southern Rhodesia where where they had three children, including Mr Polanski, who was born in 1944.
Sierra Leone, Singapore, Southern Rhodesia that included two unusual postmarks - "Plumb Tree" and "Fig Tree".
Mhike, I (2012), "'Untidy tools of colonialism': Education, Christianity and social control in Southern Rhodesia: the case of 'night dances'--1920s to the 1930s", Studia Historiae Ecclestiasticae, Vol 38, Supplement, pp 57-79.
It chronicles how the once verdant landscapes of colonial Zimbabwe were transformed into near waste in the first four decades of colonial occupation from 1890; highlights how the diverse voices of environmental concern that appeared at the time compelled the colonial Zimbabwean state finally to institute the Commission of Inquiry into the Preservation of the Natural Resources of the Colony of Southern Rhodesia in 1938; and examines how this Commission's recommendations became the basis for the establishment of a number of institutional regulatory systems to initiate an efficiency-oriented approach to the management of the colony's natural resources.
In chapters six ("Racism as a Weapon of the Weak") and seven ("Loyalty and Disregard"), I found Lee's discussion of the internal debates within these multiracial communities fascinating, especially how carefully he pieces together the Eurafricans in Southern Rhodesia's not-so-subtle racism and unsettling pledges of loyalty to the British empire.
Ian's career and hobbies, which included a passion for fishing, led the family on a life of adventure as they travelled from Livingstone in Northern Rhodesia to Bulawayo in Southern Rhodesia. Ian also loved prospecting, going all over Matabeleland Province in Rhodesia in pursuit of amethyst, rose quartz and agate.
He was then Chief Justice of Southern Rhodesia, and the fishing camp located on the Zambezi known as Olive Beadle, named after his wife.
Rhodes escaped the noose, but left behind a country named in his honour, Southern Rhodesia.
Book 2 begins in 1952 with Sasa Savage just 17 when Rupert moves onto his farm in Southern Rhodesia. Rupert, aged 28, wanted to make good on a promise made to Rigby concerning his daughter Sasa.
Lessing's father went on to become a clerk with the Imperial Bank of Persia and the author became practiced in moving on as a child, as after the family had returned to Britain, they then went to farm maize in Southern Rhodesia.

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