Soviet Central Asia


Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Soviet Central Asia

n
(Placename) the region of the former Soviet Union now occupied by Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan. Also called: Russian Turkestan or West Turkestan
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, it is planned to transport ecological fruits, special and express cargo from the Soviet Central Asia in a short time.
Rustam's story illustrates the challenges faced by ethnically mixed couples in Soviet Central Asia as they chose names for their children.
It also includes previous Soviet Central Asia, Caspian Sea, parts of inner China, Xinjiang province of China, Inner Mongolia as well as parts of Tibet.
True tales by one of Scotland's greatest adventurers, transporting readers from Soviet Central Asia to Yugoslavia during World War II.
Botakoz Kassymbekoya, in his essay, "Hapless Imperialists: European Developers in Soviet Central Asia in the 1920s and 1930s," traces Tajik statehood to the Soviet imperialism in the early twentieth century, when Tajikistan was forcibly incorporated into the Soviet state.
Slightly larger than California, Turkmenistan is almost equidistant from the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans and occupies the south-western corner of what was formerly Soviet Central Asia. As the Soviet Union collapsed in late 1991, the Central Asian republics and Azerbaijan declared their independence.
Jinnah, the author explains, read Muslim nationalism in world-historical terms alone, as a product of world wars and the failure of multinational states, as a vehicle for the liberation of Muslims oppressed in places like China and Soviet Central Asia, and as an "unfortunate necessity" (38, 39).
Putin and Xi also talked about the Silk Road Economic Belt, an ambitious Beijing project intended to encourage the infrastructure development in formerly Soviet Central Asia. (end) as.mb
The restless valley in the title refers to the Fergana Valley, the most fertile region of the former Soviet Central Asia, divided by Stalin between the Uzbek, Tajik and Kyrgyz SSRs.
It is at the center of what was once Soviet Central Asia, with the largest population (about 30 million, almost as much as the other four "stans" combined) and the greatest concentration of industry and transportation links.
Rumer, Soviet Central Asia: A Tragic Experiment, 1989, pxiv