socialist realism

(redirected from Soviet Realism)
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socialist realism

n.
A Marxist aesthetic doctrine that seeks to promote the development of socialism through didactic use of literature, art, and music.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

socialist realism

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (in Communist countries, esp formerly) the doctrine that art, literature, etc should present an idealized portrayal of reality, which glorifies the achievements of the Communist Party
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

so′cialist re′alism


n.
a state-approved style in art or literature that celebrates the worker's life in a socialist country.
[1930–35]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

socialist realism

a Marxist-inspired artistic and literary theory or doctrine that calls on art and literature to promote the socialist cause and sees the artist, writer, etc. as a servant of the state or, in the words of Stalin, “the engineer of human souls.”
See also: Art, Communism
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations

socialist realism

n (Art, Liter) → sozialistischer Realismus
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Contrasting plays by two Davids, both masters in their field, combining in Theatr Clwyd in May 2019, when, in the right-hand corner from the USA, David Mamet's humorous and imaginative "Duck Variations" faces, in the left-hand corner, David Hare's "The Bay at Nice" a play set in the Hermitage Art Gallery, Leningrad, where impressionist art clashes with harsh Soviet realism.
All this was to collapse in the 1930s under the triumph of Soviet Realism. A handful of exiles--among them Naum Gabo and El Lissitzky--influenced such figures as Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, Kurt Schwitters, and Joaquin Torres-Garcia, ensuring the lasting impact of the movement, but within Russia it was crushed.
The 2012 image, with its echoes of Soviet realism, features two muscular and toned women sporting traditional pinnies and headscarves.
In Maus's account he explains the different strategies used by Russian writers, strategies such as mimicking official discourse or parodying Soviet realism. When he describes Vasilly Aksyonov's Our Golden Ironburg as a "fragmented and meandering narrative" (158), this is not so much a value judgment as an explanation of how the narrative form itself could make a political statement.