Soviet Zone


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Soviet Zone

n
(Placename) that part of Germany occupied by Soviet forces in 1945–49: transformed into the German Democratic Republic in 1949–50. Also called: Russian Zone
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Zone to the Soviet Zone. Fate--i.e., the Soviets--landed him in East Germany, officially the German Democratic Republic.
The first definitive issued in the Soviet Zone, some commemoratives were issued showing the 'Peoples Progress' and the rebuilding of important buildings that had been damaged during the War.
(1) Berlin, the German capital, lay in the middle of the eastern Soviet zone, but it, too, was divided for occupation among the four victorious Allies.
It should be added that unless he/she were a renegade and member of the prewar communist party, hardly any Polish Catholic would dream of escaping to the Soviet zone: it would mean instant death or being shipped off to the Gulag.
Since Berlin lay inside the Soviet Zone, the other Allies were guaranteed rail, road, water (canal), and air access to the city via specified routes.
Improved relations with Japan may be useful for Putin when pressuring China to recognize the Russian sphere of influence in the former Soviet zone, where effort has been invested to maintain powerhouse status.
Created solely to act as a military bulwark against the Soviet Union and its Warsaw Pact allies, NATO survived the end of the Cold War and - taking advantage of a diminished Russia - began expanding into areas previously considered part of the Soviet zone of influence.
His Von SBZ zur DDR, 1945-68 (From Soviet Zone of Occupation to German Democratic Republic) was also first published in 1969 and has been revised, updated and reprinted into the twenty-first century.
DEFA wanted to appeal to German film-going audiences in a style that would also re-educate them, but, in the aftermath of World War Two, intellectuals in the Soviet zone agreed that the cinema of the Hitler dictatorship should be rejected and that a new kind of film should take its place.
His books include Stalin's Genocides (Princeton), Fires of Hatred-.Ethnic Cleansing in 20th Century Europe (Harvard), and The Russians in Germany: The History of the Soviet Zone of Occupation (Harvard).

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