Soviets


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Soviets

(ˈsəʊvɪəts; ˈsɒv-)
n
1. (Peoples) the people or government of the former Soviet Union
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the people or government of the former Soviet Union
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Soviets - the government of the Soviet Union; "the Soviets said they wanted to increase trade with Europe"
political science, politics, government - the study of government of states and other political units
state - the group of people comprising the government of a sovereign state; "the state has lowered its income tax"
References in classic literature ?
Primarily: examinations, when we perform the bodily movement of writing it down; conversation, when we assert it to display our historical erudition; and political discourses, when we are engaged in showing what Soviet government leads to.
"The Soviets started dumping waste from reprocessed plutonium into Karachay in the early 1950s, and extreme levels of radiation are still being monitored there."
The Soviets pumped oil from Baku on the western shore across Russia to the port of Novorossisk on the Black Sea, which forces shipping to pass through the narrow Bosphorous strait near Istanbul, Turkey.
Despite its pallid music by Boris Asafiev, the style of the ballet is instant drama, showing what the Soviets called "socialist realism," but which was not so far removed from the dance-acting reforms proposed by the pre-Soviet choreographer Michel Fokine at the turn of the century.
Following the dissolution of the Supreme Soviet, the Moscow City Soviet and district Soviets were disbanded.
"The European Community this year is committing 400 million ecu--about $500 million--to pay European companies, accountants and consultants to provide technical assistance to the Soviets, and next year the number is probably going to double."
Not two weeks after the pathetically mishandled coup in the Soviet Union collapsed, an article in the Sunday New York Times business section proclaimed: "Now Is the Time to Invest in the Soviets." Positively jubilantly in its declaration that "the hardliners are out; pent-up consumer demand is enormous," the paper of record rhapsodized about the enormous potential awaiting American marketers.
If the Soviets manage to solve this dilemma and deal with the internal structural problems that inhibit the conversion to a market economy, they still face the formidable problems that discourage Western companies from doing business within the Soviet Union.
The American Psychiatric Association (APA) supported the conditional readmittance of the All-Union Society because it appeared the Soviets might otherwise have the votes to return with no strings attached, says APA's director of international affairs Ellen Mercer.
"A significant reduction in the Soviet arsenal is the most promising (and least threatening) way to manage a transition from a bipolar world to one with the Soviets in decline," Campbell concludes.
This is exactly what the Soviets under Khrushchev did, according to Elisa Schaar, senior editor of the Harvard International Review.
The Soviets, however, refused to participate and instead installed a Communist puppet regime in the North, headed by Kim Il Sung, who had lived in exile in Russia during World War II.