lecithin

(redirected from Soybean lecithin)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

lec·i·thin

 (lĕs′ə-thĭn)
n.
1. Any of various substances containing phosphatidylcholine and a variety of other phospholipids, extracted from soybeans, egg yolks, or other sources and used as emulsifiers in a wide range of commercial products, including foods, cosmetics, paints, and plastics.

[French lécithine : Greek lekithos, egg yolk + French -ine, -in.]

lecithin

(ˈlɛsɪθɪn)
n
(Biochemistry) biochem any of a group of phospholipids that are found in many plant and animal tissues, esp egg yolk: used in making candles, cosmetics, and inks, and as an emulsifier and stabilizer in foods (E322). Systematic name: phosphatidylcholine
[C19: from Greek lekithos egg yolk]

lec•i•thin

(ˈlɛs ə θɪn)

n.
1. any of a group of phospholipids, containing choline and fatty acids, that are a component of cell membranes and are abundant in nerve tissue and egg yolk.
2. a commercial form of this substance.
[1860–65; < Greek lékith(os) egg yolk + -in1]

lec·i·thin

(lĕs′ə-thĭn)
A fatty substance containing phosphorus that is present in most plant and animal tissues and is an important structural part of cell membranes. Lecithin is used commercially in foods, cosmetics, paints, and plastics for its ability to form emulsions.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lecithin - a yellow phospholipid essential for the metabolism of fats; found in egg yolk and in many plant and animal cells; used commercially as an emulsifier
emulsifier - a surface-active agent that promotes the formation of an emulsion
phospholipid - any of various compounds composed of fatty acids and phosphoric acid and a nitrogenous base; an important constituent of membranes
Translations
letsitiin

lec·i·thin

n. lecitina, elemento esencial en el metabolismo de las grasas presente en los tejidos de los animales, esp. el tejido nervioso.

lecithin

n lecitina
References in periodicals archive ?
It is refined from soybean lecithin. Its main active ingredient is diacylphospholipidcholine that accounts for about 52%.
A completely randomized bifactorial (2x4) experiment was designed, with lipid sources (fish oil: FO or soybean lecithin: LO) as a first factor, and as second factor the lipid concentration in the diets with four levels (10, 15, 20 and 25%), in addition, a commercial diet for tilapia (Silver Cup, 15% lipids) was used as a control.
Methionine with Lipoid S 75 was entrapped in unsaturated soybean lecithin with an encapsulation efficiency of 77.6%.
Rodriguez et al., "Biopolymer coating of soybean lecithin liposomes via layer-by-layer selfassembly as novel delivery system for ellagic acid," Journal of Functional Foods, vol.
6% soybean lecithin caused higher sperm motility and plasma membrane integrity in cryopreserved boar sperm.
According to Realfarmacy.com, "Soybean lecithin comes from sludge left after crude soy oil goes through a "de-gumming" process.
(2009) documented that the extender supplemented with 6% soybean lecithin caused higher sperm motility and plasma membrane integrity in cryopreserved boar sperm.