soybean

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Related to Soybean proteins: Soy protein, Soya protein

soy·bean

 (soi′bēn′)
n.
1. An annual leguminous plant (Glycine max) native to East Asia, widely cultivated for its seeds, which are used for food, as a source of oil, and as animal feed.
2. A seed of this plant.

soy•bean

(ˈsɔɪˌbin)

n.
1. a bushy Old World plant, Glycine max, of the legume family, grown in the U.S. chiefly for forage and soil improvement.
2. the seed of this plant, used for food, as a livestock feed, and for a variety of other commercial uses.
[1795–1805]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.soybean - a source of oilsoybean - a source of oil; used for forage and soil improvement and as food
Glycine max, soja, soja bean, soya, soybean plant, soya bean, soybean, soy - erect bushy hairy annual herb having trifoliate leaves and purple to pink flowers; extensively cultivated for food and forage and soil improvement but especially for its nutritious oil-rich seeds; native to Asia
bean - any of various seeds or fruits that are beans or resemble beans
2.soybean - erect bushy hairy annual herb having trifoliate leaves and purple to pink flowerssoybean - erect bushy hairy annual herb having trifoliate leaves and purple to pink flowers; extensively cultivated for food and forage and soil improvement but especially for its nutritious oil-rich seeds; native to Asia
soya, soya bean, soybean, soy - the most highly proteinaceous vegetable known; the fruit of the soybean plant is used in a variety of foods and as fodder (especially as a replacement for animal protein)
legume, leguminous plant - an erect or climbing bean or pea plant of the family Leguminosae
genus Glycine, Glycine - genus of Asiatic erect or sprawling herbs: soya bean
soy, soya bean, soybean - a source of oil; used for forage and soil improvement and as food
3.soybean - the most highly proteinaceous vegetable known; the fruit of the soybean plant is used in a variety of foods and as fodder (especially as a replacement for animal protein)
soy flour, soybean flour, soybean meal - meal made from soybeans
soyabean oil, soybean oil - oil from soya beans
bean, edible bean - any of various edible seeds of plants of the family Leguminosae used for food
field soybean - seeds used as livestock feed
soy sauce, soy - thin sauce made of fermented soy beans
Glycine max, soja, soja bean, soya, soybean plant, soya bean, soybean, soy - erect bushy hairy annual herb having trifoliate leaves and purple to pink flowers; extensively cultivated for food and forage and soil improvement but especially for its nutritious oil-rich seeds; native to Asia
Translations
soijasoijapapu
szójabab
soia大豆
sójový bôb
sojasojaböna
References in periodicals archive ?
Clinolipid should not be used in patients with a known hypersensitivity to egg or soybean proteins, or in those with severe disorders of lipid metabolism (hyperlipidemia).
With an annual output of 90,000 tons of soybean protein, Shansong's non-GM soybean proteins have spread all over the world.
Moreover, the investigators have shown that the fermentation of soybean proteins reduces soybean's immunoreactivity toward human IgE, through the removal of epitopes (parts of antigens) present in the native soybean protein.
Maybe that's the reason why the demand for our non-GM soybean proteins has increased sharply these day," Mr.
Transient hypersensitivity to soybean proteins resulting in diarrhea and poor health status is well known in the nutrition of weaned pigs (Li et al.
Soybean proteins are deficient in this essential nutrient.
Shan Song, a professional manufacturer and supplier of non-GM soybean proteins, declared that the demand for their non-GM soybean proteins in over 100 countries and regions had increased greatly in the last two months.
Interrelationship between hypersensitivity to soybean proteins and growth performance in early-weaned pigs.
As you may know, soybean proteins are divided into three basic groups: soy flours, which are about 50% protein; soy concentrate, which is about 70% protein; and soy protein isolate, which is about 90% protein.
Only the portion of heat-labile ANCs in SBM can be partially destroyed through roasting and extrusion, however, ninety percent protein residues in soy protein isolate are belonging to the two heat-stable globulins, glycinin and conglycinin, and are the allergen for the hypersensitivity and commonly associated with villous atrophy and malabsorption in weaning pig after ingestion of intact soybean proteins (Pluske et al.
1994) reported that processed soybean proteins, such as isolated or concentrated soybean protein, were utilized almost as well as milk protein in 21 to 35 day-old pigs.