Spaces


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space

 (spās)
n.
1.
a. Mathematics A set of elements or points satisfying specified geometric postulates: non-Euclidean space.
b. The infinite extension of the three-dimensional region in which all matter exists.
2.
a. The expanse in which the solar system, stars, and galaxies exist; the universe.
b. The region of this expanse beyond Earth's atmosphere.
3.
a. An extent or expanse of a surface or three-dimensional area: Water covered a large space at the end of the valley.
b. A blank or empty area: the spaces between words.
c. An area provided for a particular purpose: a parking space.
4. Reserved or available accommodation on a public transportation vehicle.
5.
a. A period or interval of time: within the space of a week.
b. A little while: Let's rest for a space.
6. Sufficient freedom from external pressure to develop or explore one's needs, interests, and individuality: "The need for personal space inevitably asserts itself" (Maggie Scarf).
7. Music One of the intervals between the lines of a staff.
8. Printing One of the blank pieces of type or other means used for separating words or characters.
9. One of the intervals during the telegraphic transmission of a message when the key is open or not in contact.
10. Blank sections in printed material or broadcast time available for use by advertisers.
v. spaced, spac·ing, spac·es
v.tr.
1. To organize or arrange with spaces between: Carefully space the words on the poster.
2. To separate or keep apart: The buildings are spaced far from each other.
3. Slang To stupefy or disorient. Often used with out: The antihistamine spaces me out so I can't think clearly.
v.intr. Slang
To be or become stupefied or disoriented. Often used with out: I was supposed to meet her, but I spaced out and forgot.

[Middle English, area, from Old French espace, from Latin spatium.]

spac′er n.

Spaces

See also places.

a mania for open spaces.
an abnormal fear of being in crowded, public places like markets.
an abnormal fear of a void or of open spaces.
an abnormal fear of enclosed spaces. Also called cleistophobia.
nothingness.
References in classic literature ?
Warrior: 2 feathers; 2 spaces straight in any direction or combination.
SOCRATES: And does not this line, reaching from corner to corner, bisect each of these spaces?
Her mountains, her plains, every projection was as clearly discernible to their eyes as if they were observing it from some spot upon the earth; but its light was developed through space with wonderful intensity.
No one gave a thought to the older worlds of space as sources of human danger, or thought of them only to dismiss the idea of life upon them as impossible or improbable.
As the late Edward Forbes often insisted, there is a striking parallelism in the laws of life throughout time and space: the laws governing the succession of forms in past times being nearly the same with those governing at the present time the differences in different areas.
It lingered but a moment's space, that dream of Spring, and died; Yet as my head the pillows pressed, my soul had found thy side.
Thus, when you and I, asleep or dozing off to sleep, fall through space and awake to sickening consciousness just before we strike, we are merely remembering what happened to our arboreal ancestors, and which has been stamped by cerebral changes into the heredity of the race.
The low houses of London look so much more homely than the tall ones that I never pass them without dropping a blessing on their builders, but this house was ridiculous; indeed it did not call itself a house, for over the door was a board with the inscription "This space to be sold," and I remembered, as I rang the bell, that this notice had been up for years.
Behold me -- I am a Line, the longest in Lineland, over six inches of Space --" "Of Length", I ventured to suggest.
(1) To whatever degree we may imagine a man to be exempt from the influence of the external world, we never get a conception of freedom in space. Every human action is inevitably conditioned by what surrounds him and by his own body.
This distinguished scientist has expounded his views in a book entitled "Verschwinden und Seine Theorie," which has attracted some attention, "particularly," says one writer, "among the followers of Hegel, and mathematicians who hold to the actual existence of a so- called non-Euclidean space--that is to say, of space which has more dimensions than length, breadth, and thickness--space in which it would be possible to tie a knot in an endless cord and to turn a rubber ball inside out without 'a solution of its continuity,' or in other words, without breaking or cracking it."
There are really four dimensions, three which we call the three planes of Space, and a fourth, Time.