Spaniard


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Span·iard

 (spăn′yərd)
n.
1. A native or inhabitant of Spain.
2. A person of Spanish ancestry.

[Middle English, from Old French Espaniard, from Espaigne, Spain, from Latin Hispānia.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Spaniard

(ˈspænjəd)
n
1. (Peoples) a native or inhabitant of Spain
2. (Plants) NZ short for wild Spaniard
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Span•iard

(ˈspæn yərd)

n.
a native or inhabitant of Spain.
[1350–1400; < Old French (e)spaignart=Espaigne Spain + -art -ard]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Spaniard - a native or inhabitant of SpainSpaniard - a native or inhabitant of Spain  
Espana, Kingdom of Spain, Spain - a parliamentary monarchy in southwestern Europe on the Iberian Peninsula; a former colonial power
European - a native or inhabitant of Europe
Castillian - a native or inhabitant of Castile
Catalan - a native or inhabitant of Catalonia
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Španěl
spanier
hispaanlane
espanjalainen
Španjolac
スペイン人
스페인 사람
spaniolspaniolă
spanjor
ชาวสเปน
người Tây Ban Nha

Spaniard

[ˈspænjəd] Nespañol(a) m/f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Spaniard

[ˈspænjərd] nEspagnol(e) m/f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Spaniard

nSpanier(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

Spaniard

[ˈspænjəd] nspagnolo/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

Spaniard

إِسْبَانِيّ Španěl spanier Spanier Ισπανός español espanjalainen Espagnol Španjolac spagnolo スペイン人 스페인 사람 Spanjaard spanjol Hiszpan espanhol испанец spanjor ชาวสเปน İspanyol người Tây Ban Nha 西班牙人
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in classic literature ?
As we went on shore upon the tide of flood, near high water, we rowed directly into the creek; and the first man I fixed my eye upon was the Spaniard whose life I had saved, and whom I knew by his face perfectly well: as to his habit, I shall describe it afterwards.
And first, it is necessary to repeat that I had sent away Friday's father and the Spaniard (the two whose lives I had rescued from the savages) in a large canoe to the main, as I then thought it, to fetch over the Spaniard's companions that he left behind him, in order to save them from the like calamity that he had been in, and in order to succour them for the present; and that, if possible, we might together find some way for our deliverance afterwards.
De Guiche fired the first shot at ten paces and missed his man; and the Spaniard, who had advanced to meet Raoul, aimed in his turn, and Raoul felt a pain in the left arm, similar to that of a blow from a whip.
The Spaniard sprang forward and seized the gun by its muzzle, in order to strike Raoul on the head with the butt.
I kept my piece in my hand still without firing, being willing to keep my charge ready, because I had given the Spaniard my pistol and sword: so I called to Friday, and bade him run up to the tree from whence we first fired, and fetch the arms which lay there that had been discharged, which he did with great swiftness; and then giving him my musket, I sat down myself to load all the rest again, and bade them come to me when they wanted.
Otter told Philip that the model was a Spaniard and that he had never sat before.
it were better so than to be polluted by his touch," answered the Spaniard, with his black eyes sparkling with rage and hatred.
A second Spaniard, who was the brother of the first, instantly drew his sword and flew at Pendragon, and after a short but furious combat in which both got three wounds in as many minutes, Pendragon drove his blade through the other's body and the second Spaniard was accounted for.
Nobody entered the alley or left it; no- body resembling the Spaniard entered or left the tavern door.
But above all he longed to fight the Spaniards, who were the great sea kings of those days.
And from this time he began to seek new alliances and to temporize with France in the expedition which she was making towards the kingdom of Naples against the Spaniards who were besieging Gaeta.
I really cannot say now whether I loved the Moors or the Spaniards more.